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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 110 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 42 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Homer or search for Homer in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
terary pastime, for he noted as he approached this hostelry that it brought to his mind some romantic descriptions of rural scenes in Spenser's Faerie Queene. The day following his arrival at Boston being Sunday, he attended meeting, where he heard solid sense, strong connected reasoning and good language. For the rest of this day's entry in his journal he records staid at home this night, reading a little of Homer's First Iliad. As he does not say, we can only guess whether he took his Homer in the original or through a translation. With Latin we know that he was on intimate terms, even without the evidence of his Scottish medical degree. While at Newport he writes: I stayed at home most of the forenoon and read Murcius [Meursius], which I had of Dr. Moffatt, a most luscious piece, from whom all our modern salacious poets have borrowed their thoughts. I did not read this book upon account of its lickerish contents, but only because I knew it to be a piece of excellent goo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
were certainly written by Byles, and others are tributes to his genius. Indeed, the purpose of the volume was to extol Byles as a poet worthy to be mentioned with Homer and with his only modern rival, Pope. Already America was looking for its Homer, a search that was to continue with increasing assiduity throughout the century-anHomer, a search that was to continue with increasing assiduity throughout the century-and Boston found him in Byles. More original and interesting than the poems of Byles are the humorous verses of his friend Joseph Green (1706-1780), a Boston distiller possessed of literary tastes, who ranked with Byles as a wit and social favourite. After the outbreak of the Revolution he too became a Tory, and finally found reftell conditions in the decade following the Revolution. The verse is that of Pope and Goldsmith, from whom many passages are paraphrased; the style is a parody of Homer, Dante, Milton, and Pope; and the mock-heroic method is conventional; yet the satire through its wit and good sense deserved its immense popularity. The speech of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
erfowl), is the first term in a simile on man's moral life; in this phase Bryant's thought of nature differs from that of Homer, the Psalmist, Jesus, or any sage or seer, Pagan or Christian, only in the appositeness, more or less, of the illustrativ Like Cowper and Longfellow, and so many others, Bryant turned, in later life, to a long task of translation, in his case Homer, as relief from sorrow. The literary interest was to see if he might not, by closeness to the original and simplicity ofle, simplicity of ideas, nobility of manner, Bryant's translation is inadequate mainly in the first and the last, but the Homer is, in any case, a proof of intellectual alertness, scholarship, and technical skill. All his translations, many of themters of the Mississippi Godwin, Prose, vol. II, p. 269. (themselves introduced as a simile to illustrate the fame of Homer); there are his fundamental metaphors, the grammar of his dialect, as that of the past as a place, occurring in the edito
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
gook has undergone even a greater change, has got back all the cunning and pride which had been deadened in Indian John. But Hawkeye and Chingachgook are both limited by their former appearance; one must still be the canny reasoner, the other a little saddened with passing years. The purest romance of the tale lies in Uncas, the forest's youngest son, gallant, swift, courteous, a lover for whom there is no hope, the last of the Mohicans. That Uncas was idealized Cooper was ready to admit; Homer, he suggested, had his heroes. And it is clear that upon Uncas were bestowed some of the virtues which the philosophers of the age had taught the world to find in a state of nature. Still, after a century, many smile upon the state of nature who are yet able to find in Uncas the perennial appeal of youth cut off in the flower. The action and setting of the novel are on the same high plane as the characters. The forest, in which all the events take place, surrounds them with a changeless
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
onslaught — the retreat as sudden — the midnight tramp — the moonlight bivouack --the swift surprise, the desperate defence — the cruel slaughter and the headlong flight-and, amid the fierce and bitter warfare, always, like a sweet star shining above the gloom, the faithful love, the constant prayer, the devoted homage and fond allegiance of the maiden heart! The passage is almost a generalized epitome of his Revolutionary romances. It also betrays the fact that by epic Simms meant not Homer but Froissart. If he is more bloody, he is also more sentimental than Cooper. His women, though Nelly Floyd in Eutaw is strikingly pathetic and mysterious, and Matiwan in The Yemassee is nearly as tragic as romance can make her, are almost all fragile and colourless things, not because Southern women were, but because pseudo-chivalry prescribed. His comedy is successful only, and there not always, in the words and deeds of the gourmand Porgy. Simms is a master in the description of land
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
ory of Virginia, a, 26 Hobbes, 188 Hoffman, C. F., 225 n., 231, 279-280, 308, 310 Hoffman, Josiah Ogden, 246, 247 Hoffman, Matilda, 247 Hogarth, 12 Holme, John, 151 Holmes, O. W., 241, 261, 263, 320 Home as found, 209, 302 Homer, II, 12, 160, 165, 170, 174, 268, 273, 277, 298, 316 Homer (Bryant), 273 Home sweet home, 220 Homeward bound, 209, 302 Hooker, Thomas, 43, 45-48 Hope Leslie, 310 Hopkins, John, 156 Hopkins, Lemuel, 164, 174 Hopkins, Dr., SamueHomer (Bryant), 273 Home sweet home, 220 Homeward bound, 209, 302 Hooker, Thomas, 43, 45-48 Hope Leslie, 310 Hopkins, John, 156 Hopkins, Lemuel, 164, 174 Hopkins, Dr., Samuel, 330 Hopkins, Stephen, 127, 128 Hopkinson, Francis, 122, 167, 177, 215-216 Horace, 161 Horse-Shoe Robinson, 311 Houdetot, Countess de, 199 House of fame, 176 House of night, the, 181, 183 Howard, Martin, 128, 129 Howe, Julia Ward, 223 Howe, Lord, 91, 99 Howe, Sir, William, 145, 226 Hubbard, Rev., William, 25, 27, 28, 47 Hudibras, 112, 118, 171, 172, 173, 287 Hugo, Victor, 269 Humboldt, 187 Hume, 27, 29, 91, 97, 287 Humphreys, David, 164, 169, 174 Hu