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yet known, this completes the list of fatal casualties among the officers; that of the privates is not yet received. The State will embalm the memory of these noble men, as it preserves the fame of its heroes of revolutionary days. This reverse calls for renewed and vigorous effort on the part of all loyal citizens to maintain the Federal Government. Therefore, I, Samuel G. Arnold, Lieutenant-Governor, do hereby call upon the good people of this State to come forward without delay and volunteer their services in defence of the Constitution and the laws. Arrangements will at once be made for the commandants of the several military companies to enroll men to serve for three years or during the war, unless sooner discharged. Let the response to this call be prompt, decided, and such as will show that the martial spirit of our State is alike indomitable in victory or defeat. Samuel G. Arnold, Lieutenant Governor. By His Honor's command, John R. Bartlett, Secretary of State.
Mayor's Court. --Yesterday, as usual on Monday morning, there was a large crowd in attendance at his Honor's levee, and also a considerable number of unfortunates, the accumulated catchings of the police for the last two days. A number of the cases invite comment, on account of the subject involved, but a bare statement must suffice. Geo. Frick had Mr. A. Dill up for an alleged assault. It appeared the misunderstanding arose in reference to some pigs bought — if we understood the matter correctly — by Frick from Dill's agent, and not paid for. The plaintiff affirmed, and defendant denied, any assault. Case continued. John Curren, charged with drunkenness, disorderly conduct, and an assault on his better half, went to jail in default of surely to amend his ways. Degrassy Drumwright, arrested as a suspicious person, was discharged on condition that he would leave Richmond by sundown. Francis S. Childress, arrested for incendiary language, was acquitted. C. ve
Mayor Wood "Secedes." --It is stated that Mayor Wood has seceded from St. George's Church, in New York, in consequence of the Rector's criticism and condemnation of the alleged unchristian spirit of his Honor's recent thanksgiving proclamation. Mr. Wood will hereafter worship at Grace Church.
The forgery case. --The Mayor yesterday resumed for consideration of the case of Wm. Cackson, charged with forging the name of T. McAllister & Co., of Covington, Va, to eight draft for $200. The question of jurisdiction was the matter which be proposed to decide. He alluded to the fact that the draft was sent here by letter, dated at Covington, and the presumption was that the forgery was committed there, Mr. Sutton, one of the witnesses for the Commonwealth, brought to his Honor's notice the case of Argentine, who was tried here for uttering forged paper, while the forgery was alleged to have been committed in Petersburg. The Mayor did not admit the similarity between the cases, for the prisoner in the present case wrote and collected the draft by letter, while Argentine came and presented the paper in person. It was, however, determined to continue the matter until to day. Appearances indicate that the accused will be sent to Covington for trial.
iscourteous to His Royal Highness. I unhesitatingly answer that I neither saw nor heard anything insulting, unkind or discourteous to the Prince. I considered the reception of His Royal Highness at Richmond to be in no degree interior in courtesy and cordiality to that which he met with in the other cities which he visited in the United States. I need say no more to assure you that it was regarded as perfectly satisfactory, and remembered with pleasure and gratitude. I am, sir. your Honor's most obedient, humble servant. Lyons.The Honorable Joseph Mayo,"Mayor of Richmond." "Richmond, Dec. 18, 1860. My Dear Sir: In reply to the interrogatory propounded by you to me this morning, relative to the alleged insult offered to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, curing his recent visit to this city. I can most unhesitatingly affirm that I neither saw nor heard any act or word that could, in the remotest degree, be construed into a mark of disrespect to His Royal H
osoms can enfold A frozen Northern heart. Let no true man stay to hear, Let woman with them cope-- Perchance some word of hers may hush The traitrous tons, and bring a flush Of shame to mantle o'er the brow Of hin who boldly fronts her now, With treason on his lips. Southern men, with Southern hearts, Up!--rise to deeds of daring-- We want no glance of retrospection; No schoolboy holiday reflection; No reminiscence brought to light To prove it Wrong for you to fight-- Away — your country calls. Tell us not of "Alma Mater," Of "Chum" or "Reverend Doctors," He still, and listen to the tone, That comes with sad and plaintive mean, From graves of mothers, saking why, You will not or your country die, When that country calls. Southern men, with Southern hearts, Up! rise to deed of daring-- When peace has blest our Southern soil, She'll not forget your strife and toil-- Then men who fought with Southern host, Will be the called to Honor's post By their country's voice.
elieve, arrangements have been made for putting them to work. The quarrels and resulting fights between the men who are generally arrested by the police, have always bad or fighting whiskey as a foundation. So, also, with the women who seek his Honor's protection by getting out warrants against opponents. It will be observed by a frequenter of the Mayor's Court that the party beaten in any game of fisticuffs is the one to solicit his Honor's interference to adjust the quarrel, by producing aeen made for putting them to work. The quarrels and resulting fights between the men who are generally arrested by the police, have always bad or fighting whiskey as a foundation. So, also, with the women who seek his Honor's protection by getting out warrants against opponents. It will be observed by a frequenter of the Mayor's Court that the party beaten in any game of fisticuffs is the one to solicit his Honor's interference to adjust the quarrel, by producing an equality of punishment.
puted wife, and committed to jail in default of giving surety for his further good behavior.--Tom Griffin, free negro, was required to give surety for his appearance before his Honor next week, to answer the charge of retailing ardent spirits to be drunk at the place where sold, and selling "snacks," without license.--Some gentleman came forward and said that having lost a watch, and seen an advertisement in the Dispatch of a stolen watch which had been committed to the custody of one of his Honor's officers, he had come to see whether the latter was his. It proved to be not the one he had lost — Another gentleman stepped up and told his Honor that though he had advertised a missing horse for three successive days in the Dispatch. the man in possession of it had not informed him of its whereabouts. His Honor replied that he could not take cognizance of such an offence.--A third gentleman came forward to complain of a faithless wagoner who had failed to deliver a box entrusted to him.
was the thief. Mr. B. recognized him immediately as one of the thieves who had been previously chased out of his yard. He was ordered to receive thirty-nine lashes. Robert Pearman was sent on for examination before the Hustings Court on the charge of stealing a lot of pig iron, valued at $140, from J. R. Anderson & Co. John Pug, a free negro, charged with stealing four shad from John Tucker, in the First Market, was ordered to be whipped, but subsequently took an appeal from his Honor's decision and was remanded for examination before the Hustings Court. In the absence of Mr. Tucker from his cart, at the market yesterday, Pug took his stand beside it and commenced selling his shad without any authority to do so. When he had sold four of them Mr. Tucker again returned to his cart, but before he reached it the fellow espied him coming and slipped off with the proceeds of his sales. The following cases were continued in consequence of absent witnesses: Jim Harris and C
d was sentenced to six months imprisonment in the city jail. John Straylor, charged with the same offence, plead guilty, and was sentenced to thirty days imprisonment in jail; and Alfred Myer, also charged with petty larceny, acknowledged his guilt, and received the sentence of sixty days confinement in jail. Jerry and Morris, two slaves, charged with a misdemeanor, and ordered by the Mayor to receive twenty lashes, were tried on the appeal taken by them, and the Court re-affirming his Honor's disposition of the case, they were ordered to be whipped forthwith. James R. Shumaker, charged with stealing a saddle from Major Snowden, plead guilty to the charge and was sentenced to jail for six months. The case against Wingfield S. Tynes, charged with stealing several small pieces of cotton cloth from William Stagg, was continued till the next term, and the accused was admitted to bail for his appearance. Benjamin Degroot and William Duke, indicted for exhibiting the ga