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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 43 5 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
Stewart, and he by W. G. Callaghan. Captain Crawford was succeeded by W. Brown and he by L. C. Weems. No more gallant command followed the Southern cross through so many glorious victories to final defeat. During the Seven Days battles it was in Hood's famous brigade, and afterward was one of the regiments that followed the leadership of Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford. The Nineteenth regiment Georgia volunteers was organized with W. W. Boyd, colonel; Thomas C. Johnson, lieutenant-colonel; A. J. H 1863 mainly in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, during the greater part of 1863 in north Mississippi under Gen. J. E. Johnston, in C. C. Wilson's brigade; was in the battle of Chickamauga, in the Atlanta campaign of 1864, in Hood's expedition into Tennessee, and in the campaign of the Carolinas in the spring of 1865, surrendering with General Johnston. During its term of service Wm. J. Young became colonel; W. D. Mitchell; lieutenant-colonel, and J. C. Lamb, major. J. D
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
Tennessee. Part of the First, under Col. J. J. Morrison, and the Second, under Col. W. J. Lawton, with Colonel Wharton's Texas rangers, formed the main part of the cavalry brigade of about 1,400, with which Forrest attacked an equal force at Murfreesboro on July 13th and captured the entire Federal command. To Colonel Morrison, with a portion of his regiment, was given the duty of storming the courthouse, and after two or three hours of brisk fighting he compelled its surrender. Lieut.-Col. Arthur Hood, with a portion of the First, stormed the jail with equal success. Colonel Lawton, with the Second regiment and the Tennessee and Kentucky companies, assailed the second camp of the enemy. Said Forrest: The Georgians, under Colonel Dunlop and Major Harper, made a gallant charge almost to the mouth of the cannon. After fighting them in front two or three hours I took immediate command of this force and charged the rear of the enemy into their camps and burned their camps and s
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
urg campaign and at Missionary Ridge; went all through the Atlanta campaign, then participated in Hood's gallant but unsuccessful attempt to recover Tennessee for the Confederacy. Finally, after all e Tennessee campaign, where with the First volunteer regiment it formed part of the rear guard on Hood's retreat; was consolidated in the spring of 1865 with the Fifty-seventh and First volunteer, theSecond Georgia cavalry regiment had at first the following officers: Col. W. J. Lawton, Lieut.-Col. Arthur Hood, Maj. C. A. Whaley, Adjt. R. F. Lawton; Capts. (A) G. C. Looney, (B) W. J. Lawton, (C) of the Carolinas. The following are some of the officers who succeeded those named above: Cols. Arthur Hood and C. C. Crews, Lieut.-Cols. J. C. Dunlop and F. M. Ison. The Third Georgia cavalry reegiment, a sketch of which has been given. The Twenty-ninth battalion Georgia cavalry, Lieut.-Col. A. Hood, included the companies of Capts. A. W. Hunter, J. T. Wimberly, F. J. Browning, L. Little
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
enty-fourth, Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips' legion. Lieut. E. S. Barclay. In Hood's division were the brigade of Gen. George T. Anderson—Seventh Georgia, Col. W. W. White; Eighth, Col. John R. Towers; Nin. Hodges, and Twentieth, Col. John A. Jones. McLaws' division got into position opposite the Federal left about 4 p. m. Hood's division was moved on farther to the enemy's left, which it partly enveloped. That evening these two divisions, half Gesed to artillery fire from the heights and musketry fire from the troops at their front before the base of the ridge. General Hood was wounded and Gen. E. M. Law took command of that division. But the gray swept on until, as General Law has describt, and the brigade skirmishers under Capt. S. D. Cockrell, repulsed the effort of the Federal cavalry to turn the flank of Hood's division. During this combat the Ninth Georgia, under Capt. George Hillyer, moved at double-quick and saved a battery f
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
sle of Hope, three light batteries, 176 men; at Rosedew, two companies Cobb guards, 135 men; at Beaulieu, Hanleiter's light artillery and two companies Twenty-seventh battalion, 218 effective; at Fort McAllister, Brooks' light battery and Company A, Twenty-seventh battalion, 93 men, and the First Georgia regulars, 238 effective, in charge of Federal officers imprisoned; at Oglethorpe barracks, three companies reserves, 145 men; at White Bluff, Guerard's light artillery, 93 effective. Colonel Arthur Hood's Twenty-ninth Georgia battalion, 302 strong, and three companies South Carolina cavalry, 134 men, were on coast guard from the Ogeechee to St. Mary's. General McLaws stated that to be relieved from guard duty for an entire day was an uncommon occurrence with any soldier of his little command. On August 17th, one of the companies of South Carolina cavalry was surprised and mostly captured by a Federal force near South Newport. In October, 1864, after the close of the Atlanta a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
Gettysburg, more than 2,000 officers and men of Hood's division were killed or wounded, and among the severely wounded were Generals Hood and G. T. Anderson. In September following he had sufficienter-general, and he was frequently in command of Hood's famous division of the First corps, participaful charge, General Law was ordered to withdraw Hood's division from the line it had held at Round Tember 21, 1864, after the fall of Atlanta, when Hood was preparing for his march into Tennessee, Jac along the Salkehatchie river and to assist General Hood's army as it came through; from Branchvillesburg and reached the field just as Jackson and Hood were being forced back before the overwhelming going into this battle Walker had expressed to Hood his appreciation of the task that had been assimond, his command at that time being a part of Hood's celebrated Texas brigade. At Second Manassasouth Mountain and Sharpsburg, Wofford commanded Hood's brigade, that general being in charge of the [1 more...]