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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 202 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
back the Federal line. The attack was made by Hood's Texas brigade and two commands of Hampton's bGeorgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson, vying with Hood's gallant Texans in the steady advance. The Fe of the fleet being opened on the Confederates, Hood and Hampton withdrew their supports and resumedl Johnston had ordered the brigades of Whiting, Hood, Pettigrew, Hatton and Hampton, under Whiting, ee's whole line was made at 7 o'clock, and when Hood had gained the wooded bluff and turned the Fede troops at the battle of Gaines' Mill were with Hood and Longstreet. The brigades of Hood and Law cHood and Law composed Whiting's gallant division, which had marched from Ashland as the advance of Jackson's corpsk, capture his artillery and decide the day. Hood moved to the final assault with Hampton's legioion was Law's splendid brigade. Immediately on Hood's right was Pickett's brigade, and in support orue of the Hampton legion, Colonel Gary. General Hood reports that he ordered the legion to gain [3 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
's right, with a front of seven brigades: First Hood, with his brigades, supported by Evans; then Keolumn, was in close supporting distance, behind Hood and Evans. R. H. Anderson with three brigades legion infantry was in Wofford's brigade, with Hood on the left. Bachman's and Garden's batterieshad settled down on that great field of strife, Hood and Evans and Kemper and D. R. Jones and R. H. ting the operations of the 29th and 30th. As Hood's right swept on in its battle, Jenkins and Hunon kept abreast of it, and Evans, in supporting Hood, came into battle connection with Jenkins. Thiuse and south of it, while Evans, who supported Hood's two brigades, passed beyond and north of it. Wofford, who commanded Hood's right brigade, refers to his advance against a battery at or east of riday morning he took Bachman's battery, by General Hood's order, to the extreme right on the Orangethem. On the 30th, in the afternoon, following Hood's advance, Bachman and Garden advanced down the
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
he south of the Boonsboro road, and D. H. Hill north of it. Hood's division prolonged the line on Hill's left bending west uhe Hagerstown road. Jackson, early on the 16th, was put on Hood's left, with his right on the Hagerstown road. Stuart withng order: Walker, D. R. Jones, Evans (brigade), D. H. Hill, Hood, Lawton, J. R. Jones, cavalry. The artillery opened the grth Hooker's corps on the Confederate left. Jackson's and Hood's troops held their ground with great courage and firmness,d and Sumner were engaged in these battles with Jackson and Hood, while the latter were reinforced from time to time by threlker. These forces, with Jackson's two small divisions and Hood's two brigades, had forced the battle beyond the Hagerstownhows the work which had been done by the troops of Jackson, Hood, D. H. Hill and the brigade from D. R. Jones. He said: On McLaws and Walker, and the rallied fragments of Jackson's, Hood's, Hill's and Jones' troops. In this great achievement K
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
eft, and Jackson's, four divisions, the right wing of Lee's army. From Longstreet's left, resting on the river at Taylor hill, to Jackson's right on the wooded height at Hamilton, the divisions stood as follows: Anderson's, McLaws', Pickett's and Hood's, of Longstreet's wing; and A. P. Hill's, of Jackson's wing. Ransom's division was in support of the guns on Marye's and Willis' hills. Behind A. P. Hill were the divisions of Early, Taliaferro and D. H. Hill in columns of division. A. P. Hillds were posted as follows: Gregg's brigade on the right, as has been noted; McIntosh's battery, with Lieut.-Col. R. L. Walker's guns, on the extreme right of A. P. Hill; Jenkins' brigade with Pickett's division; Bachman's and Garden's batteries on Hood's line; Rhett's battery in Alexander's battalion; Kershaw's brigade in McLaws' line, with the left of the brigade resting on Hazel run. The brigade of Gen. N. G. Evans, with Boyce's battery, had been ordered to South Carolina early in November.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
le for the line of battle, organized in seven corps; the First under Reynolds, the Second under Couch, the Third under Sickles, the Fifth under Meade, the Sixth under Sedgwick, the Eleventh under Howard, the Twelfth under Slocum. The artillery included 370 guns, of all calibers. The cavalry force outnumbered General Lee's three to one. General Lee's army was numerically not as strong as at the battle of Fredericksburg, Longstreet having been sent south of the James with the divisions of Hood and Pickett, and Hampton's cavalry brigade having been sent into the interior to recruit its horses. Lee's army confronting Hooker numbered of all arms, on the 1st of April, 53,303, with 170 pieces of artillery. McLaws and Anderson commanded the divisions of Longstreet's corps present, and Early, A. P. Hill, Rodes and Colston commanded Jackson's divisions; W. H. F. Lee and Fitzhugh Lee commanded the two brigades of cavalry under Stuart, and General Pendleton the artillery battalions of Alex
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
's division commanders were McLaws, Pickett and Hood; Ewell's, Early, Rodes and Johnson; A. P. Hill'o) and Captain Bachman's German artillery, with Hood's division, and the Brooks (Rhett's) battery, Ls corps on the right facing east. McLaws' and Hood's divisions of Longstreet's corps camped within's advanced position at the peach orchard, with Hood on his right facing the Round Tops. General Lee's order of attack directed that his right (Hood and McLaws), strongly supported by artillery, shouLongstreet's corps made the advance at 4 p. m. (Hood's and McLaws'), supported by four of the five bbatteries of Bachman and Garden, operating with Hood, on the extreme right of Longstreet's battle. ure, to support a battery between his right and Hood's left. Marching forward under the fire of ctle in support of artillery between Kershaw and Hood. Here, at the rocky hill, was the battle groun of 630. Bachman's and Garden's batteries with Hood's right, and Rhett's battery, under Lieutenant
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
n the battle; as, for instance, the brigades of Hood's and Mc-Laws' divisions, and the artillery of des, 2 batteries. Longstreet's corps, Major-General Hood: McLaws' division, 2 brigades; Hood's diHood's division, 3 brigades; Hindman's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Reserve artillery, 5 batteries. Stewart's division in front of Vineyard's, and Hood's on his left, vigorously attacked. Stewart dred and was repulsed from the road. Stewart nor Hood had artillery, and neither could hold what was follows: Stewart (touching Cleburne), Johnson, Hood, McLaws, Hindman and Preston. The line of the des to the left and took position in support of Hood. Manigault's brigade, including the Tenth and two brigades of McLaws' division, and after General Hood was wounded, he took the direction of his t the divisions of Preston, Hindman, Kershaw and Hood driving the Federal right to Snodgrass and drawohnson's; Anderson from Hindman's, and Law from Hood's, with Kershaw's brigade, all directed by Kers[1 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
mand on the left, had the important duty of holding the river line of communication, and cutting off Rosecrans' supplies. Hood's division, at this time, was commanded by Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins, and Col. John Bratton commanded Jenkins' brigade, whind artillery, that like a wall of flame opposed them. Prisoners began to come in, and we discovered that we were opposing Hood's division of Longstreet's corps. . . . After nearly half an hour's desperate fighting . . . the enemy extended his attackanks as correspondingly overwhelming as were their numbers to those of our own Spartan band. . . . The veteran division of Hood had sought to annihilate us. . . . The enemy was driven from the field, after a most desperate struggle of three hours dur reported his total present at about 2,400, loss 216.] Early in November, Longstreet, with the divisions of McLaws and Hood (under Jenkins), including the South Carolina brigades of Jenkins and Kershaw, and Fickling's battery, was ordered up the
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
uson's battery, Lieut. R. T. Beauregard; and in Hood's corps by the Tenth regiment, Col. James F. Pra movement toward the southeast of Atlanta, General Hood caused an attack upon Thomas on Peachtree cuth Carolina artillery officer, took command of Hood's corps, with the rank of lieutenant-general, asteadily pushed southwestward. On August 25th, Hood's line, west and south of Atlanta, had extendeds distant from the city. Early in August General Hood sent General Wheeler with half his cavalry s hard at work breaking up the Macon railroad. Hood was holding on to Atlanta with Stewart's corps,ordered everything against Jonesboro, while General Hood directed Hardee to return Lee's corps to Atptember 1st. That he succeeded in reaching General Hood, with Thomas and Schofield directly in his battle on the 1st and of its results, that General Hood reported to Richmond: Hardee's corps was ating these events, Sherman retreated to Atlanta, Hood concentrated his army at Palmetto, near the Cha[10 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
mauga and Knoxville campaigns, where he was in command of the brigade while Jenkins had charge of Hood's division. After the death of Jenkins at the battle of the Wilderness, he was at once promoted ongstreet was sent to the assistance of Bragg at Chattanooga, Jenkins' brigade was transferred to Hood's division, and reached the field of Chickamauga after the battle. During the investment of Chatents arriving under Hooker, and then accompanied Longstreet in the Knoxville campaign, commanding Hood's division. He took a conspicuous part in the operations in east Tennessee, and then, early in 1e struggle, from Dalton to Ezra church. He subsequently participated in the operations under General Hood, until he fell severely wounded in the disastrous battle of Franklin, Tenn. After the conclu the Federal fleets and army in 1863 and 1864. In January, 1865, he was ordered to report to General Hood, and at the last was assigned to command of a division of Cheatham's corps of the army in Nor
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