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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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se operations were conducted by Gen. Longstreet, are worthy of the highest praise. He was worthily seconded by Major-Gen. Hill, of whose conduct and courage he speaks in the highest terms. Major-Gen. Smith's division moved forward at four o'clock, Whiting's three brigades leading. Their progress was impeded by the enemy's skirmishers, which, with their supports, were driven back to the railroad. At this point Whiting's own and Pettigrew's brigades engaged a superior force of the enemy. Hood's, by my order, moved on to cooperate with Longstreet. Gen. Smith was desired to hasten up with all the troops within reach. He brought up Hampton's and Hatton's brigades in a few minutes. The strength of the enemy's position, however, enabled him to hold it until dark. About sunset, being struck from my horse, severely wounded by a fragment of a shell, I was carried from the field, and Major-General G. W. Smith succeeded to the command. He was prevented from resuming his attack on
ness, Wilcox, Featherstone and Pryor dash forward at a run, and drive the enemy with irresistible fury; to our left emerge Hood's Texan brigade, Whiting's comes after, and Pender follows. The line is now complete, and forward rings from one end of ts, Pryor's, and Featherstone's brigades, who formed our right; and we are positive that from the composition of Whiting's, Hood's, and Pender's brigades, who flanked the enemy and formed our left, they never could be made to falter; for Whiting had the Eleventh, Sixteenth and Second Mississippi, and two other regiments. Hood had four Texan and one Georgia regiment, and the material of Pender's command was equally as good as any, and greatly distinguished itself. These were the troops most engad Gen. Wheat was instantly killed by a ball through the brain. At a later hour of the evening, one of his compatriots, Gen. Hood, of the Texas brigade, dashed into a Yankee camp, and took a thousand prisoners. And so with Jackson and Stuart pushing
discovered a regiment of the enemy advancing on us from that camp; we opened fire on them, at the same time advancing upon them. After receiving two or three volleys they threw down their arms and surrendered. It was the Fourth regiment of New-Jersey volunteers. Colonel Simpson and his Lieutenant-Colonel surrendered their swords and two stands of colors. A company was detached and the prisoners marched to the rear, when I formed in line of battle and remained until the arrival of Brigadier-General Hood. The regiment of the enemy taken was larger at least by one hundred men (at the time of its capture) than mine. Throughout the action my officers and men, without exception, conducted themselves in a manner satisfactory, fully sustaining the name and character of the Texas soldiers. When all behaved so well, distinction cannot be made. My color-bearer was shot down and the colors immediately raised by Captain Brantley, of company D, of the colorguard. In the list of casualties I
y cavalry to proceed at once to Lebanon. The total effective strength of the command at Murfreesboro on the morning of the thirteenth inst., did not therefore exceed eight hundred and fourteen men, including pickets. The attack was made at daybreak on the morning of the thirteenth inst., by the Second cavalry brigade C. S.A., Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest, over three thousand strong, consisting of one Texas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Walker, the First and Second Georgia regiments, Cols. Wharton and Hood, one Alabama regiment, Col. Saunders, and one Tennessee regiment, Col. Lawton. The noise of so many hoofs upon the macadamized roads at full speed was so great that the alarm was given before the head of their column reached our pickets, about a mile distant, so that our men were formed and ready to receive them, although they came in at full speed. The Texans and a battalion of the Georgia regiment, in all over eight hundred strong, attacked the detachment of the Ninth Michigan volunteers.
ss from loss of blood compelled him. Major E. M. Carey of the Twelfth Ohio, was shot through the thigh late in the action, in which he had greatly distinguished himself by his gallantry and cool courage. Captains Skiles and Hunter, and Lieutenants Hood, Smith, Naughton and Ritter of the Twenty-third Ohio, and Captains Liggett and Wilson of the Twelfth Ohio, were also wounded in the engagement. Lieut. Croome, commanding a section of McMullin's battery, was killed whilst serving a piece is. Still our boys fought desperately, perhaps as they never fought before. Whole brigades were swept away before the iron storm; the ground was covered with the wounded and dead. Ewell's old division, overpowered by superior numbers, gave back. Hood with his Texans, the Eighteenth Georgia and the Hampton Legion rushed into the gap and retrieved the loss. Ewell's men rallying on this support, returned to the fight, and adding their, weight to that of the fresh enthusiastic troops, the enemy i
in command of the corps. Early in the engagement Lieut.-Colonel R. B. Hayes, commanding the Twenty-third Ohio, was severely wounded in the arm whilst leading his regiment forward. He refused to leave the field for some time, however, till weakness from loss of blood compelled him. Major E. M. Carey of the Twelfth Ohio, was shot through the thigh late in the action, in which he had greatly distinguished himself by his gallantry and cool courage. Captains Skiles and Hunter, and Lieutenants Hood, Smith, Naughton and Ritter of the Twenty-third Ohio, and Captains Liggett and Wilson of the Twelfth Ohio, were also wounded in the engagement. Lieut. Croome, commanding a section of McMullin's battery, was killed whilst serving a piece in the place of the gunner who had been killed. In the Kanawha division the casualties were five hundred and twenty-eight, of which one hundred and six were killed, three hundred and thirty-six wounded, and eighty-six missing, of all of which a ful
that bloody work was going on. The Federals outnumbered us three to one. Their best troops were concentrated upon this single effort to turn our left, and for two hours and a half the tide of battle ebbed and flowed alternately for and against us. Still our boys fought desperately, perhaps as they never fought before. Whole brigades were swept away before the iron storm; the ground was covered with the wounded and dead. Ewell's old division, overpowered by superior numbers, gave back. Hood with his Texans, the Eighteenth Georgia and the Hampton Legion rushed into the gap and retrieved the loss. Ewell's men rallying on this support, returned to the fight, and adding their, weight to that of the fresh enthusiastic troops, the enemy in turn were driven back. Reenforced, they made another desperate effort on the extreme left, and here again was a repetition of the scenes I have described. For a time they flanked us, and our men retired slowly, fighting over every inch of ground.
he was standing down past the fleet. At this time the ram was receiving the fire of most all the vessels of our flotilla. She succeeded in passing the fleet and in reaching Vicksburgh, although, it is supposed, with considerable damage. The ram was pumping a heavy stream of water from her side, from three miles above the mouth of Yazoo River until she passed the fleet. The following are the casualties: Killed belonging to the Tyler — Oscar S. Davis, Third Assistant Engineer; T. Jeff. Hood, seaman. Wounded — John Sebastian, pilot, lost left arm; David Hiner, pilot, slightly; R. H. Smith, pilot, slightly; J. W. Holly, coal-heaver, lost right arm; J. J. Milford, seaman, severely; R. Williamson, seaman, severely; James Hughes, seaman, slightly; James Morris, seaman, slightly; Richard Carter, seaman, slightly; Fred. Cooper, seaman, slightly; Stephen Tracy, seaman, slightly. Killed belonging to detachment of Fourth Wisconsin regiment, detailed as sharp-shooters, on the Unit