Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Hood or search for Hood in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

Virginia — it was the more bloodless proceeding-and very soon the soldiers of the army understood that Lee was moving. A grand review of the cavalry was ordered, near Culpeper Court-House, and General Fitz Lee politely sent an invitation to General Hood to attend it, and bring any of his friends. A day or two afterwards, Hood appeared with his great division, announcing that these were all his friends, and he thought he would bring them along. The review duly took place east of the Court-HHood appeared with his great division, announcing that these were all his friends, and he thought he would bring them along. The review duly took place east of the Court-House. The squadrons of cavalry charged-General Stuart and his staff in front; cannon thundered in mimic conflict; the sun shone; bright eyes flashed; and beneath the Confederate banner, rippling on its lofty pole, the Commander-in-Chief sat his iron-gray, looking on. Festivities at the Court-House followed; the youngsters of the army had a gay dance with the young ladies from the country round; and almost in the midst of the revelry, as at Brussels on the night of Waterloo, the thunder of artil
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Facetiae of the camp: souvenirs of a C. S. Officer. (search)
ns of Culpeper. That gay and gallant commander, General Fitz Lee, thereupon, sent word to General Hood to come and see the review, and bring any of his people --meaning probably his staff and headquarters. On the second day the gray masses of Hood's entire division emerged, with glittering bayonets, from the woods in the direction of the Rapidan. You invited me and my people, said HoodHood, shaking hands with General Fitz, and you see I have brought them! Laughter followed, and General Fitz Lee said: Well, don't let them halloo, Here's your mule! at the review. If they e will charge you! interrupted General Wade Hampton, laughing. For all that the graybacks of Hood, who duly attended the review, did not suppress their opinions of the cavalry. As the horsemen c tall flag under which General R. E. Lee sat his horse looking at them, a weather-beaten Texan of Hood's Old Brigade turned round to a comrade and muttered: Wouldn't we clean them out, if Old H