Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hood or search for Hood in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
3219 17th MissBarksdale'sMcLaws'40160200 14th S. CGregg'sPender's262206252 11th MissDavis'Heth's32170202 55th N. CDavis'Heth's39159198 11th Ga G. T. Anderson'sHood's32162194 38th Va Armistead'sPickett's23147170 6th N. CHoke'sEarly's2013121172 13th MissBarksdale'sMcLaws'28137165 8th AlaWilcox'sAnderson's.22139161 47th N. 52154 52d N. CPettigrew'sHeth's33114147 5th N. CIverson'sRodes'31112143 32d N. CDaniel'sHeth's26116142 43d N. C Daniel'sHeth's21126147 9th Ga.G. T. Anderson's.Hood's8115143 1st Md. BatStewart'sJohnson's25119144 3d ArkRobertson'sHood's26116142 23d N. CIverson'sRodes'4193134 57th VaArmistead'sPickett's351054144 I must nHood's26116142 23d N. CIverson'sRodes'4193134 57th VaArmistead'sPickett's351054144 I must not fail to mention in this connection the record of Company C, 11th North Carolina, which was with Pettigrew at Gettysburg on July 1, and lost a captain and lieutenant, and thirty-four out of thirty-eight men. The company had three separate captains on that terrible day. The first was made major; the second, Thomas Watson Cooper,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
f victory. The soldiers of the Texas army were impatient of discipline, but braver men never lived. They were of the same material as those who made name and tame for Texas across the Mississippi. Fathers serving in Tennessee had sons here with Green, Walker or Polignac; one brother would be marching and fighting, ragged and barefooted, in Virginia, while another followed the flag through the swamps of Louisiana. They were of the same blood and of the same families with those who composed Hood's brigade and Terry's rangers, which organizations deserve to rank in valor with the legions of Caesar and the battalions of Napoleon. The disbanding of the troops began about the middle of May, and up to the 31st there were men under arms in isolated commands or where remnants of regiments still devoted to the cause kept together and refused to accept the inevitable; but the forces continued to be depleted day by day. On May 21st part of a regiment still remained at Corpus Christi; on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
ve that city, and caused him to evacuate Palatka and to use the river below Jacksonville with the greatest caution. On the night of the 25th of July, 1864, I received a telegram from General Bragg at Columbus, Ga., directing me to report to General Hood at Atlanta without delay for duty in the field. I started to Atlanta on the morning of the 26th of July and reached Atlanta on the night of the 28th. On the 29th I was assigned to and on the 30th assumed command of my old division composed oinridge's division, Army of Tennessee, by order of War Department; but was soon thereafter sent to assume command of Confederate forces then operating in East Florida. On the 24th of July, 1864, was ordered back to Army of Tennessee, reaching General Hood's headquarters at Atlanta on the eve of the 28th; was that night re-assigned to command of Hindman's old division, composed of the following brigades: Brigadier-General W. F. Brantley's Mississippi brigade, Brigadier-General Z. C. Deas' Alabam
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
wo divisions to the front at dawn of day on the 2d. The only question I propose to consider now is, at what hour did the troops of General Longstreet reach General Lee? For, as will be shown later, there appears to be a contradiction in General Longstreet's own statements about this. In his book, page 362, General Longstreet says: The stars were shining brightly on the morning of the 2d, when I reported at General Lee's headquarters and asked for orders. After a time Generals McLaws and Hood, with their staffs, rode up, and at sunrise their commands filed off the road to the right and rested. Sunrise in that locality and at that date is about 4:35 o'clock A. M. General McLaws, in speaking of the movements of his division on that occasion, says: My division camped at Willoughby Run, about four miles from Gettysburg, on the night of July 1st, about 12 o'clock, perhaps it was later. While there I received an order to move on at 4 A. M. of 2d; but that order was countermanded, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of a terrible battle. (search)
er. S. A. Cunningham, editor of the Confederate Veteran, tells a story of his personal experience in the great battle of Franklin. It will be remembered that Hood had brought his army into Tennessee, while Sherman had gone on to the sea. Hood had almost succeeded in cutting off Schofield's forces at Columbia, having reached Hood had almost succeeded in cutting off Schofield's forces at Columbia, having reached the vicinity of Spring Hill, between there and Franklin at night-fall of the day before the battle. No event of the war perhaps showed a scene equal to this charge at Franklin. The range of hills upon which we formed, offered the best view of the battlefield, with but little exposure to danger, and there were hundreds collecte Strahl was quiet, and there was an expression of sadness on his face. The soldiers were full of ardor, and confident of success. They had unbounded faith in General Hood, whom they believed would achieve a victory that would give us Nashville. Such was the spirit of the army as the signal was given which set it in motion. Our
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
erate against the enemy at Harper's Ferry. General Longstreet, with his command, embracing six brigades under D. R. Jones, Hood's two brigades and Evans' brigade, was ordered to move to Boonsborough and halt. General D. H. Hill, with his division, wton and Anderson, and later in the day he was joined by General Longstreet, with the brigades of Pickett, Kemper, Jenkins, Hood, Whiting and Evans; only four of these, however, numbering about 3,000 men, became seriously engaged. Thus it will be seeour brigades (under Lawton, until wounded, and then Early). Longstreet's command—D. R. Jones' division of six brigades, Hood's division of two brigades and Evans' (unassigned) brigade, D. H. Hill's division of five brigades, R. H. Anderson's divisigades, comprised only 2,430 men, the enormous disparity of force with which I contended can be seen. The strength of General Hood's division at the commencement of the campaign was 3,852 (see return of July 20, 1862). His official report gives the