Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Hood or search for Hood in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
ing on his right, he determined to bring Smith's corps into line. A portion of this corps, under Hood, marched directly upon Fair Oaks by way of Nine Mile road to support Longstreet's attack. The reke the right flank and rear of the Federals who were defending Seven Pines. It was four o'clock. Hood arrived at Fair Oaks with his fresh troops, and swept everything before him. He cut the Federal l thick wood of Cold Harbor and the clusters of trees which extend its line toward the river. General Hood, who was then one of the most brilliant officers in the Confederate army, although he subsequ thinning more and more, their long line scarcely wavered. They paused for a moment to fire, but Hood instantly pushed them forward; they rushed onward with loud yells to the very mouth of the guns wals. The Confederates, fatigued by the effort they have just made, halt to re-form their lines. Hood's brigade alone has lost over one thousand men in the last charge. Stuart, near Cold Harbor, doe
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
troops of Jackson, he found in these positions Hood's division, which Longstreet, henceforth at peren made manifest by the battle between King and Hood—everything indicated to Pope the necessity of pthe Antietam against all attacks on that side. Hood, at the head of two brigades, guarded the impord been posted in the vast space which separated Hood's right at Dunker Church from Hill's left on thrating himself from the centre, came to relieve Hood's brigades in the woods they had so stubbornly he small division of Starke, which had relieved Hood, and which, sheltering itself behind trees, roc rest of his division to Jackson's assistance. Hood, who had been held in reserve since the day pre, and these two generals resumed the offensive, Hood against Williams, Hill against Green. The rentietam, had as early as eight o'clock, just as Hood had resumed the offensive, despatched an order ounded. These were the debris of Jackson's and Hood's divisions, that Sedgwick had just driven out [8 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
ne was entirely occupied by Longstreet's corps; Hood, from the elevation on the right, communicated overing to him the whole Federal army, and when Hood's outposts had exchanged a few shots on the rig afternoon of the 12th, A. P. Hill had relieved Hood in the works erected along the margin of the wods from Hamilton's Crossing to Bernard's Cabin; Hood had taken position on the heights between Deep treme end of the wood above mentioned. Most of Hood's guns occupied the summit of Lee's Hill, from s exposed to a cross-fire from the batteries of Hood and McLaws, which caused them considerable lossy chance of success. The positions occupied by Hood were as formidable as those of Jackson, and weland the adjoining woods, which were occupied by Hood's right and the left of A. P. Hill. The groundelief of the defenders of Marye's Hill; one of Hood's brigades, led by Jenkins, had gone to take poht along the whole line occupied by Jackson and Hood; consequently, when daylight came, Lee was arde
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
Magruder; 4 brigades, under D. R. Jones. 2d, G. Smith; 8 brigades, under Wilcox, A. P. Hill, Pickett, Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 or 5 briwas divided into six divisions: 1st, Magruder; 6 brigades. 2d, Smith; 7 brigades, under Wilcox and Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 brigadesl. 1st Brigade, Elzey (afterward Early); 2d Brigade, Trimble; 3d Brigade, Seymour. 3d Division, Whiting. 1st Brigade, Hood; 2d Brigade, Laws. 4th Division, D. H. Hill. 1st Brigade, Rhodes; 2d Brigade, Colquitt; 3d Brigade, Garland; 4th Brigadalker. 1st Brigade, Ransom, 4 regiments, 1 battery; 2d Brigade (formerly Walker), 4 regiments, 1 battery. 3d Division, Hood. 1st Brigade, Anderson, 5 regiments; 2d Brigade, Law, 4 regiments; 3d Brigade, Wofford, 4 regiments of infantry, 1 of cav
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
. Bayard's Division. Brigade, ......; brigade, ..... Reserve Artillery, Hunt. Confederate army. Commander-in-chief, General R. E. Lee. 1st corps, Longstreet. 1st Division, R. H. Anderson. Wright's brigade, Armistead's brigade, Wilcox's brigade, Perry's brigade, Featherstone's brigade, Mahone's brigade. 2d Division, Pickett. Kemper's brigade, Jenkins' brigade, Walker's brigade. 3d Division, Ransom. Brigade, ...... (formerly Ransom's); Cook's brigade. 4th Division, Hood. Law's brigade, Toombs' brigade, G. T. Anderson's brigade, Robertson's brigade, Evans' brigade. 5th Division, McLaws. Howell Cobb's brigade, Barksdale's brigade, Kershaw's brigade, Semmes' brigade, Drayton's brigade. Artillery, Walton. 2d corps, Jackson. 1st Division, A. P. Hill. Field's brigade, Gregg's brigade, Thomas' brigade, Lane's brigade, Archer's brigade, Pender's brigade. 2d Division, D. H. Hill. Rodes' brigade, Iverson's brigade, Doles' brigade (formerly Ripley's)