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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Atlanta Hood or search for Atlanta Hood in all documents.

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ing, out of 318 engaged. Capt. J. A. Bivin and Lieut. M. S. McLeroy were killed in front of the line. Maj. H. V. McCain was wounded. Lieut.-Col. T. C. Standifer and Sergt.-Maj. H. Brunner were honorably mentioned. After the evacuation of Atlanta Hood designed a campaign to lure Sherman from Atlanta, cut his communications and force a battle further north. On September 25th President Davis arrived at headquarters, and on the next day, after a serenade by the Twentieth Louisiana band, he adnt Davis arrived at headquarters, and on the next day, after a serenade by the Twentieth Louisiana band, he addressed the soldiers. Three days later the army began its movement northward. In the most serious engagement which followed, that at Allatoona, the Pointe Coupee artillery took part. Slocomb's battery, under Chalaron, did effective work at Dalton. Hood, closely pursued by Sherman, fell back into Alabama, and Sherman returned to Atlanta, burned the city, and set out for Savannah.
Chapter 19: The Tennessee campaign under Hood Scott's brigade at Franklin the Washington artillery at Murfreesboro battle of Nashville the retreat the Louisiana brigade in the rear Guard last days of the army of Tennessee. Hood having failed to draw Sherman into Tennessee, Beauregard, now close at hand, was ster 2, 1864, to the department of the West, including the department commanded by Hood and that of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, to which Lieut.-Gen. Richaras nothing less than to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterprise, but unfortunately was hindered by perilous d, with instructions from Thomas to hold it until the post could be made secure. Hood quickly resolved to crush Schofield before he could obey Thomas' order. His tro Rousseau was at this time strongly fortified at Murfreesboro, with 8,000 men. Hood, on the way from Franklin to Nashville, stopped Bate's division long enough to