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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 465 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 382 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 375 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 344 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 303 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 283 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 274 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 267 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 253 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 250 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. B. Hood or search for J. B. Hood in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
of the brave, the gallant J. B. Hood, to the command of the army with the rank of General. General Hood Commanding army of Northern Georgia. Hood was offered a sacrifice on the shrine of his couHood was offered a sacrifice on the shrine of his country, and be it said to his glory and honor that, knowing it, he, for his country's good, unhesitatingly accepted its consequences. On his assumption of the command of the army, if I recollect correcs, paid him before the Legislature of Mississippi the year previous, was called to the command of Hood's corps, and our equally gallant and intrepid Jacob H. Sharp and others, tried and true men, weretruthfully and proudly relate them of himself. The writer will never forget the remark made by Hood the night after he crossed the Chattahoochie and had established headquarters with General W. H. er came up and reported that the last of the army had crossed and the pontoons had been taken up, Hood remarked to the circle of officers present: I once more feel glorious; I am north of the Chattaho