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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 1,058 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 437 13 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 314 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 275 7 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 212 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 207 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 168 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 156 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 126 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John B. Hood or search for John B. Hood in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

of his fortified posts—such as Tullahoma, which the Confederates had used as a depot of supplies—and driving him to new headquarters. It was a short campaign, at the end of which Bragg, evacuating Tullahoma, had marched into Chattanooga. Rosecrans' main object in September was to maneuver Bragg out of Chattanooga; and he succeeded by crossing the mountains south of that city, upon which Bragg fell back to Lafayette, Ga. Bragg had just received help from Mississippi, and Longstreet, with Hood and Kershaw, was speeding from Virginia. Rosecrans made a faulty movement by dividing his army into three columns, thus getting his right and left wings hazardously separated from his center. His position became full of peril and gave to Bragg an excellent chance to overwhelm some one of these pieces on the board, after which the others would be easy victims; but there were unfortunate delays and the opportunity was lost. By September 18th the scattered Federal wings joined Rosecrans and a
e Louisiana cavalry was represented by Guy Dreux‘ company at headquarters, the artillery by Vaught's company with Hardee's corps and Capt. Charles E. Fenner's with Hood's. When Polk's army of Mississippi joined that of Tennessee at Resaca it brought a brigade under command of Col. Thomas M. Scott, of the Twelfth regiment (that , he is remembered as the militant bishop of the Confederacy. the attempt to hold the Chattahoochee, the retreat across it, the relief of General Johnston by Gen. John B. Hood, and the fierce battles of Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, and Ezra Church, July 20th to 28th. During these operations Gibson's brigade was in the division commrs would leave their position. Finally Sherman secretly withdrew from his lines and was at Jonesboro, essential to the railroad communication of Atlanta, before Hood was fully persuaded of his intentions. Gibson's brigade, sent to Jonesboro with Lee, put his men in line of battle August 31st, and was ordered to the attack upon
ctant to leave their guns, fought the enemy, in many instances, almost within reach of the guns. With this retreat, John B. Hood passed from the field of active Confederate movement. Time was passing swiftly; the Confederacy was within a few mont A moribund government, no more than a dying man, cares about new ventures with old agents. Like the Marechal de Villars, Hood, full of fire, had always shown himself a better fighter than a strategist He planned a campaign as impetuously as he fougcontrolling desire to conquer. The reaction after Nashville was intensely painful for a nature so ardent and hopeful as Hood's. Far more painful, however, was the dissatisfaction which, as he learned day by day during that retreat, had sprung up ay honest in his nature, the humility genuinely felt by this dashing captain must excite the sympathy of all brave men. General Hood relinquished his command on the 28th of January, by authority of the President. The retreat from Nashville had brou
h Col. S. D. Lee, had some practice on the Union shipping on the James. Impatient at their long inaction, eager for the fray, yelling wildly at the order of June 26th, rejoicing in the splendid show they are making when they obey it—with their sixteen guns, rifles and Napoleons taken from the enemy at Manassas and Seven Pines; throwing back cheers like shells, as they jubilantly galloped passed the Dixie battery, and feeling their hearts throb at hearing themselves cheered and yelled at by Hood's hardy Texans—the Washington artillery misses, by the narrow chance of an eighth of a summer day, the glory of baptizing its tigers—the fiery emblem of the command—and its new Napoleons in one ensanguined pool. Have patience, Washington artillery! Your tigers, cheated so far, will shortly growl at Beverly ford, on the Rappahannock, and roar their fiercest when the battalion rides, with Longstreet, through Thoroughfare gap, in search of Jackson. The Louisiana Guard, from New Orleans, le
ng, and Starke's could not have been larger, for his division numbered but ,600. The two divisions were stationed in a line behind the Dunker church, before which Hood had already been in battle. As they marched the Louisianians were under the fire of the Federal batteries beyond the Antietam, and about dark the acting adjutantgries opened a storm of shell. In a very short time over half his men were killed and wounded, and with the remnant he was compelled to retire, taking shelter with Hood's command. The Eighth suffered the heaviest loss, 103. The total casualties of the brigade were 10 officers killed and 46 wounded, 35 enlisted men killed and 243firing near the center, and about 9 o'clock were stationed at a point where other batteries had been cut to pieces. This was on the right of the Hagerstown pike. Hood, falling back, so mixed up with the enemy as to prevent the battery from using its guns. S. D. Lee immediately advanced two of Moody's guns into a plowed field w
er under Major-General Clayton, than which none did better service. In the disastrous battle of Nashville it was this splendid division which, by its steady bearing, assisted so materially in allaying the panic which threatened the destruction of Hood's army when its lines had been pierced by the exultant enemy in superior force. In the spring of 1865 General Gibson was placed in command of a small division at Spanish Fort (Mobile), including his brigade. Of his service there, Gen. Richard Tas promoted to brigadier-general. At Peachtree Creek he was particularly distinguished, leading his gallant brigade to the assault, and for his intrepid conduct received special mention by General Loring. After the fall of Atlanta he marched with Hood into Tennessee, and at the fateful field of Franklin, after winning the admiration of all by his bravery, fell seriously disabled by the explosion of a shell. Brigadier-General Leroy A. Stafford Brigadier-General Leroy A. Stafford, whose nam