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rried in his hand the whole time, behaving most gallantly under the hottest fire. The American ensign, which he never ceased to wave, was pierced with nineteen musket balls. Only three men of the boats were wounded, and the only life lost was that of the Owens to gallant Ward, who, the moment the enemy was discovered, blew the signal for the crews to come aboard, and instantly opened on the foe with his heavy guns. While the crews were engaged on the breast-works, a slave, belonging to Dr. Hooe, approached the shore with a white flag on a pole, and getting aboard the Freeborn, informed Capt. Ward that the enemy were in the underbrush near by, one thousand strong. Still the work was continued, and made ready, as the event turned, for the rebels to occupy with guns.--(Doc. 55.) A Georgia Regiment arrived in Richmond, Va., without arms, the Governor of Georgia refusing to allow more arms to be taken from the State.--Richmond Examiner, June 29. Eight companies of rebel infa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
nknown but now historic village of Manassas. There was no fun, no merriment that night. The only remnant of the We will be gay and happy still, so lustily shouted on the march, was the still part. The inhabitants received us coldly — some denied us the use of their wells; but this soon changed. They naturally at first dreaded the reputed lawlessness of the mounted ranger ; but when they found they had gentlemen as soldiers, their kindness was great. Even our best friend afterwards, old Mr. Hooe, houghed us at first; but we encamped upon his farm during our whole stay at Manassas, greatly to his grief at first, but soon he came to look upon us as a part of his family, and his evident emotion when we parted was touching. I think we had few or no troops of any arm of the service there then. We were the first, or among the first, military inhabitants of this celebrated post, but soon Marye's rifles and Corse's regiment were followed by all the troops from Alexandria, and formed th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
Union men about; that it must be certainly discovered before it could be executed. Finding I could not act there, I crossed the Potomac in an open boat pulled by four negroes. On reaching the Virginia side, I went to the residence of Dr. Howe (Hooe), about twenty miles from Fredricksburg. This place I reached at 1 A. M. This gentlemen was a perfect stranger to me, but he received me kindly, entertained me handsomely, he and his charming family so soon to be rendered houseless and homeless b, of the United States gunboat, a name ever to be remembered, desecrated as the insulter of unprotected females, firing into barns and houses, and everything but what might have been expected of an officer or a gentleman. The same day Dr. Howe (Hooe), chartered a buggy and drove me to Fredricksburg, where I arrived at six o'clock in the afternoon. On registering my name at the hotel, a gentleman, Mr. Chew, introduced himself to me, and insisted most kindly on taking me to his house, where he
At Matthias' Point the enemy have again appeared. They landed and burned Dr. Hooe's boat and stole another, on Friday. On Saturday a Yankee schooner got stuck in the mud and the "Confederates" bearded here in a boat. The crew fled and our boys climbed up 11 feet, got $50 in gold and all the sails &c., they could, and burnt her to the water's edge. She was worth about $7,000. On Sunday they fired at Dr. Hooe's house and at our pick its--Fredericksburg News. At Matthias' Point the enemy have again appeared. They landed and burned Dr. Hooe's boat and stole another, on Friday. On Saturday a Yankee schooner got stuck in the mud and the "Confederates" bearded here in a boat. The crew fled and our boys climbed up 11 feet, got $50 in gold and all the sails &c., they could, and burnt her to the water's edge. She was worth about $7,000. On Sunday they fired at Dr. Hooe's house and at our pick its--Fredericksburg News.
s for those prostrated by disease; and the patriotism does not end here, as every one who has been so unfortunate as to be sick will readily attest. I visited the hospital yesterday, and, high as is my opinion of their kindness, I was truly surprised to observe the self-sacrificing attention bestowed upon all the sick. No soldier who has been returned to his company, after spending a week at Camp Mercer Hospital, will ever forget the ladies of Fredericksburg. One poor fellow, thinking he was about to die, said to his nurse and friend from his company: "Tell Mother that the ladies have been very, very kind to me, and that I would have died much sooner but for their soothing touches." M. P. S.--Instead of a barn being burned, as I said above, I now learn certainly that it was the dwelling of Dr. Hooe. The hand of Providence is evidently protecting our men; for, frequently during the firing, shells bursted within six feet of them without inflicting the slightest scratch. M.
ls through Mr. Ben. Grymes' house, though Mr. G. was not connected with the shooting party. The Yankees have wasted an immense amount of powder and ball on this point, and have not yet succeeded in killing or wounding anybody, except a few of Doctor Hooe's tame pigeons, which the brave Budd killed with a rifle. By the way, I am told that this notorious incendiary glories in his shame, and boasts that his hand applied the burning torch to Dr. Hooe's venerable mansion — A deed of infamy that tacted with the shooting party. The Yankees have wasted an immense amount of powder and ball on this point, and have not yet succeeded in killing or wounding anybody, except a few of Doctor Hooe's tame pigeons, which the brave Budd killed with a rifle. By the way, I am told that this notorious incendiary glories in his shame, and boasts that his hand applied the burning torch to Dr. Hooe's venerable mansion — A deed of infamy that taboos him with all honorable officers of the Navy. F. F