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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 34: campaign against Pope.—Second Manassas.—Sharpsburg.—Fredericksburg. (search)
et to Hagerstown. Hill made a heroic defence, but being outflanked, fell back toward Sharpsburg during the niclht. On the morning of September 15th, General Lee stood at bay at Sharpsburg, with bare-1y 18,000 men, and confronted McClellan's whole army along Antietam Creek. Colonel Walter Taylor, in his Four years with Lee, says: The fighting was heaviest and most continuous on the Confederate left. It is established upon indisputable Federal evidence, that the three corps of Hooker, Mansfield, and Sumner were completely shattered in the repeated but fruitless efforts to turn this flank, and two of these corps were rendered useless. These corps numbered an aggregate of 40,000, while the Confederates from first to last had but barely 14,000 men. The centre had been fiercely assailed, but was held by Longstreet with Miller's guns of the Washington Artillery, General Lee's report of the battle. and a thin gray line of infantry, some of whom stood with unloaded g
hancellorsville. In the latter part of April, 1863, General Hooker crossed the Rappahannock, above Lee's position at Fredesent at the impending engagement. The Federals under General Hooker made a stand near Chancellorsville, and the west wing of Hooker's rested at Melzi Chancellor's farm, about two miles from Chancellorsville. General Jackson formed his corps intoops sent to their support. They did not even pause in General Hooker's intrenched camp, but fled in a wild rout, without haised his right hand to heaven in prayer and thanksgiving. Hooker was advancing a powerful body of fresh troops to break General Jackson's cordon about the Federal rear. While General Hooker pressed its front and the front of General Jackson's righours by Early at Fredericksburg, marched to the relief of Hooker, threatening thereby the Confederate rear. General Lee tuher assault, but on the morning of the 6th he learned that Hooker had sought safety beyond the Rappahannock. General Lee'
Chapter 38: Gettysburg. In the month of May, 1863, General R. E. Lee's army rested near Fredericksburg, while the Federal army under General Hooker occupied their old camps across the Rappahannock. Early in the month of June, finding that the Federal commander was not disposed again to cross swords with him, for the purpose of drawing him away from Virginia, so that her people might raise and gather their crops, Lee began a movement that culminated in the battle of Gettysburg. Ewell's corps was sent on in advance, and at Winchester routed and put to flight the enemy under General Milroy, capturing 4,000 prisoners and their small-arms, 2S pieces of artillery, 300 wagons and their horses, and large amounts of ordnance, commissary, and quartermaster stores; then crossing the Potomac, he passed through Maryland and into Pennsylvania. Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, Chambersburg, Pa., June 27, 1863. General orders, no. 73. The Commanding General has observed wit
p the righteous judge; repentance working deliverance to an oppressed and dispersed people; the prayers of the Church affecting the miraculous preservation of one apostle from the fate which had a short time before fallen upon another. I could not write daily as you wish, because I am not allowed to keep stationery. When it is specially granted it has to be accounted for, the whole being returned written or blank, as may be. With you it is otherwise, and the Attorney-General will probably indulge us by forwarding your letters as often as you write. His past courtesy warrants such expectation William B. Reed, of Philadelphia, recently tendered to me his professional services in a very kind and handsome letter. Thomas J. Wharton, C. E. Hooker, and Fulton Anderson, are the Mississippi lawyers who offered their services and were recognized as counsel by the United States Secretary of State. I requested permission to acknowledge their kindness by a letter; it was not granted.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Secession of Southern States. (search)
da, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama sent to North Carolina Isham W. Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W-Petters; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia., Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale; to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia sent to Missouri Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning. Mississippi sent to South Carolina C. E. Hooker; to Alabama, Joseph W. Matthews; to Georgia, William L. Harris; to Louisiana, Wirt Adams; to Texas, H. H. Miller; to Arkansas, George B. Fall; to Florida, E. M. Yerger; to Tennessee T. J. Wharton; to Kentucky, W. S. Featherstone; to North Carolina, Jacob Thompson, the Secretary of the Interior; to Virginia, Fulton Anderson; to Maryland, A. H. Handy; to Delaware, Henry Dickinson; to Missouri, P. Russell. Ordinances of secession were passed in eleven States of the Union in the following
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sickles, Daniel Edgar 1822- (search)
In 1855 he was elected State Senator, and the next year he was elected to Congress. He shot Philip Barton Key (Feb. 27, 1859), in Washington, D. C., for alleged unlawful intimacy with his wife; was tried for murder, but acquitted, and was re-elected to Congress in 1860. When the Civil War broke out he raised the Excelsior (New York) Brigade; was made colonel, and commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers in September, 1861. He commanded a brigade on the Peninsula; took command of General Hooker's troops when that officer was placed at the head of an army corps; and had a division at Antietam and Fredericksburg. At Chancellorsville he commanded an army corps; also at Gettysburg, where he lost a leg. He was promoted major-general of volunteers in 1862; retired as a major-general. United States army, in 1869; appointed minister to Spain in the latter year; and resigned in 1874. He was afterwards president of the State board of civil service commissioners, and member of Congress
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Mountain, battle of (search)
soon followed by Longstreet himself with seven brigades, making the Confederate force defending the Gap and the two crests about 30,000 strong. First the divisions of National troops of Wilcox, Rodman, and Sturgis came up, followed soon after by Hooker's troops, and a little later a general battle-line was formed Battle of South Mountain. with Ricketts's, Reno's, and King's divisions. At 4 P. M. fighting was general all along the line, and at many points the ground was contested inch by inch. General Hatch, who commanded King's division, was wounded, when General Doubleday took his command, his own passing to the care of General Wainwright, who was soon disabled. At dusk Hooker had flanked and beaten the Confederate left. Reno's command, which had gained a foothold on the crest, fought desperately until dark. At about sunset their leader, at the head of the troops in an open field, was killed. He died almost at the moment of victory, and his command devolved on General Cox.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stanton, Edwin McMasters 1814- (search)
that Thomas, who had won our victory at Chickamauga from the very jaws of defeat, repudiated the call made on him to succeed Rosecrans, and only accepted, when forced, after he had put on record his high appreciation of his late commander. Stanton had his defects, but he had no weaknesses. His very sins had a fierce strength in them, that helped on, instead of retarding his work. He could crush a personal enemy under the iron heel of his military power, but the men he favored, such as Hooker, Pope, and Thomas, were eminently fitted for the tasks assigned them. Stanton's was the master mind of the war. To his indomitable will and iron nature we owe all that we accomplished in that direction. When he saw, after the battle of Gettysburg, that the Confederacy was sinking from sheer exhaustion, he crowded on men to stamp it out. He knew that Lee was leaving a highway of human bones to mark Grant's road from the Rapidan to Richmond; that we were having more killed than the Confede
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Tennessee, (search)
ould get his army over the river without being discovered. To draw the attention of the Confederates to another quarter, Hooker was ordered to engage them on the northern side of Lookout Mountain. His entire force consisted of approximately 10,000 n Confederate force was encamped in a hollow half-way up the mountain, the summit of which was held by several brigades. Hooker began the attack on the morning of November 24. Geary, supported by Cruft, proceeded to Wauhatchie, crossing Lookout Creight o'clock, and, seizing a picket-guard of forty men, extended his line to the base of the mountain. By eleven o'clock Hooker was striving to drive the Confederates from the mountain; all his guns opened at once upon the breastworks and rifle-pitsbly past noon the plateau was cleared, and the Confederates were retreating in confusion towards the Chattanooga Valley. Hooker established his line on the easterly face of the mountain; so that, by an enfilading fire, he completely commanded the Co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
der......Jan. 25, 1863 Major-General Burnside relieved by Major-General Hooker......Jan. 25, 1863 A. D. Boileau, proprietor of the Philahe Confederate batteries at Vicksburg......April 16, 1863 Major-General Hooker crosses the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford......April 28-29, 1utterances, by orders from General Burnside......May 4, 1863 General Hooker recrosses the Rappahannock......May 5, 1863 General Grant ocovernor by the Ohio Democratic Convention......June 11, 1863 General Hooker begins the movement of his army northward from the Rappahannockithin thirteen miles of Harrisburg, Pa......June 27, 1863 Major-General Hooker relieved of command of the Army of the Potomac, and Maj.-Ge19-20, 1863 Eleventh and 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac, Major-General Hooker, ordered to middle Tennessee to reinforce the Army of the Cuthe field in veteran volunteer regiments ......Oct. 23, 1863 General Hooker crosses the Tennessee at Bridgeport, Ala., Oct. 23, and advance
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