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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for C. E. Hooker or search for C. E. Hooker in all documents.

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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 34: campaign against Pope.—Second Manassas.—Sharpsburg.—Fredericksburg. (search)
et to Hagerstown. Hill made a heroic defence, but being outflanked, fell back toward Sharpsburg during the niclht. On the morning of September 15th, General Lee stood at bay at Sharpsburg, with bare-1y 18,000 men, and confronted McClellan's whole army along Antietam Creek. Colonel Walter Taylor, in his Four years with Lee, says: The fighting was heaviest and most continuous on the Confederate left. It is established upon indisputable Federal evidence, that the three corps of Hooker, Mansfield, and Sumner were completely shattered in the repeated but fruitless efforts to turn this flank, and two of these corps were rendered useless. These corps numbered an aggregate of 40,000, while the Confederates from first to last had but barely 14,000 men. The centre had been fiercely assailed, but was held by Longstreet with Miller's guns of the Washington Artillery, General Lee's report of the battle. and a thin gray line of infantry, some of whom stood with unloaded g
hancellorsville. In the latter part of April, 1863, General Hooker crossed the Rappahannock, above Lee's position at Fredesent at the impending engagement. The Federals under General Hooker made a stand near Chancellorsville, and the west wing of Hooker's rested at Melzi Chancellor's farm, about two miles from Chancellorsville. General Jackson formed his corps intoops sent to their support. They did not even pause in General Hooker's intrenched camp, but fled in a wild rout, without haised his right hand to heaven in prayer and thanksgiving. Hooker was advancing a powerful body of fresh troops to break General Jackson's cordon about the Federal rear. While General Hooker pressed its front and the front of General Jackson's righours by Early at Fredericksburg, marched to the relief of Hooker, threatening thereby the Confederate rear. General Lee tuher assault, but on the morning of the 6th he learned that Hooker had sought safety beyond the Rappahannock. General Lee'
Chapter 38: Gettysburg. In the month of May, 1863, General R. E. Lee's army rested near Fredericksburg, while the Federal army under General Hooker occupied their old camps across the Rappahannock. Early in the month of June, finding that the Federal commander was not disposed again to cross swords with him, for the purpose of drawing him away from Virginia, so that her people might raise and gather their crops, Lee began a movement that culminated in the battle of Gettysburg. Ewell's corps was sent on in advance, and at Winchester routed and put to flight the enemy under General Milroy, capturing 4,000 prisoners and their small-arms, 2S pieces of artillery, 300 wagons and their horses, and large amounts of ordnance, commissary, and quartermaster stores; then crossing the Potomac, he passed through Maryland and into Pennsylvania. Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, Chambersburg, Pa., June 27, 1863. General orders, no. 73. The Commanding General has observed wit
p the righteous judge; repentance working deliverance to an oppressed and dispersed people; the prayers of the Church affecting the miraculous preservation of one apostle from the fate which had a short time before fallen upon another. I could not write daily as you wish, because I am not allowed to keep stationery. When it is specially granted it has to be accounted for, the whole being returned written or blank, as may be. With you it is otherwise, and the Attorney-General will probably indulge us by forwarding your letters as often as you write. His past courtesy warrants such expectation William B. Reed, of Philadelphia, recently tendered to me his professional services in a very kind and handsome letter. Thomas J. Wharton, C. E. Hooker, and Fulton Anderson, are the Mississippi lawyers who offered their services and were recognized as counsel by the United States Secretary of State. I requested permission to acknowledge their kindness by a letter; it was not granted.