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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
owed them up with shell and killed a number in their retreat. During this action the Army gun-boat Picket blew up, killing the captain and 18 men, and wounding others, who were taken on board the Louisiana and properly cared for. Acting-Master Edward Hooker is well spoken of for the manner in which he managed the guns of the Louisiana. The action must have lasted some time, as 137 shot, shell, stands of grape, and howitzer shell were fired from the Louisiana; and, if less justice is doneng-Master's Mates, G. R. Durand, J. M. C. Reville and J. B. Swett. Steamer Louisiana. Lieutenant-Commander, Alex. Murray, and Acting-Lieutenant, R. T. Renshaw [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant-Commander, Alfred Hopkins; Acting-Master Edward Hooker; Assistant Surgeon, Michael Bradley; Assistant Paymaster, W. W. Williams; Assistant Engineers, J. M. Lay, D. P. McCartney, J. H. Huxley and T. J. McK. Daniels. Steamer Mt. Vernon. Commanders, O. S. Glisson and A. G. Clary [comma
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
stant, Thos. Pemblett; Acting-Third-Assistants, L. M. Kensil and Hiram Warner. Steamer Morse. Lieutenant-Commander, Chas. A. Babcock; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. F. Winslow; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Henry Russell; Acting-Ensigns, C. F. Russell and J. F. Merry; Acting-Master's Mates, C. E. Rich, J. W. Thompson and Wm. Dunne; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thos. Devine; Acting-Third-Assistants, Geo. West and Tim. Flanders. Steamer Victoria. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Edward Hooker; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, John G. Parke; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. S. Bradford; Acting-Master, Alfred Everson; Acting-Ensign, Wm. H. Meyer; Acting-Master's Mates, B. W. Tucker and Wm. Moodey; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, T. D. Webster; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. M. Berron, John Haversfield and J. E. Robinson. Steamer Underwriter. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. Flye; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, L. R. Boyce; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. H. Brown; Acting-Master's Mates
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
. Potomac flotilla, January 1, 1864. Commander Foxhall A. Parker. Steamer Ella. Acting-Master, J. H. Eldredge; Paymaster, J. N. Carpenter; Acting-Ensign, E. A. Roderick; Acting-Master's Mates, W. H. Flood, H. C. Eldredge and W. L. Gilley; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, John F. Reilly; Acting-Second-Assistant, T. Galloway; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. Cornell, F. M. Dykes and T. H. Cross; Acting-Carpenter, J. C. Tier. Steamer Yankee. Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant, Edward Hooker; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, S. T. Brown; Acting-Ensign, G. D. Gilderdale; Acting-Master's Mates, H. C. Borden and Robert Robinson; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, W. H. Hughes and John F. Costar. Steamer Commodore Read. Acting-Master, G. E. Hill; Acting-Assistant-Surgeon, James Wilson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Duffield; Acting-Ensigns, G. E. McConnell, C. Ainsworth and L. Wold; Acting-Master's Mates, Guy Morrison, E. K. Howland and G. A. Patchke; Engineers: Acting-Fir
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Haynes, John 1633-1654 (search)
Haynes, John 1633-1654 Statesman; born in Copford Hall, Essex, England; accompanied Rev. Edward Hooker to Boston in 1633 and in 1635 was chosen governor of Massachusetts. He was one of the best educated of the early settlers in New England, and possessed the qualities of an able statesman. He went to the valley of the Connecticut with Mr. Hooker in 1636; became one of the most prominent founders of the Connecticut colony; was chosen its first governor, in 1639; and served alternately wiMr. Hooker in 1636; became one of the most prominent founders of the Connecticut colony; was chosen its first governor, in 1639; and served alternately with Edward Hopkins until 1654. Mr. Haynes was one of the five who drew up the written constitution of Connecticut, the first ever framed in America (see Connecticut). He was a man of large estate, spotless purity of character, a friend of civil and religious liberty, and was always performing acts of benevolence. He probably did more for the true interests of Connecticut than any other of the earlier settlers. He died in Hartford, March 1, 1654.
mes, Capture of a Confederate Schooner fitting out as Privateer. A correspondent, writing from on board the U. S. steamer Louisiana, Fortress Monroe Oct. 24, says: Our steamer has been here three weeks, during which time we had quite a brush with the rebels, the upshot being the burning of a schooner they were fitting out for a privateer. The loss on their side, from their own acknowledgement, was eight killed and wounded. Our only mishap was the severe wounding of Acting Master Edward Hooker by a rifle bullet passing through the shoulder blade. He is doing well, and expects to be quite recovered in a month from this. A Suspicious South Carolina lady. The South Carolina lady who has been in Washington several weeks, endeavoring to sell the Government the code of signals adopted by the rebels, has not succeeded.--The Government does not seem disposed to invest $100,000 for the aforesaid signals, nor does the lady find ready access to our camps Uncharitable su