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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
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l. While Lee was watching him from his old heights back of Fredericksburg Hooker had taken a march on him, massing 40,000 men on his left flom Fredericksburg, was ready to meet him. After barely feeling Lee, Hooker tempted him by retiring into the Wilderness, facing toward Fredericto abatis and bristling at every avenue of approach with artillery, Hooker was practically impregnable. Lee soon drew back from the purposelee broken ground. He proposed to sweep with a rapid movement around Hooker's front, attack on his right flank, taking him in reverse, and cut play once again his victorious flanking game. He knew that to pass Hooker's entire front was most hazardous. The broken country, however, grull retreat to Richmond. But Jackson was in sinuous advance toward Hooker's right flank. By 5 o'clock in the evening, having reached the pikumphing in the rout of the enemy's right flank, opened the road to Hooker's final retreat to his old Falmouth camps. Throughout the critical
west of Harrisburg. In the last days of June these commands were ordered back by General Lee toward South mountain. Hooker, haunting the north bank of the Rappahannock, had observed Ewell's movement into the valley and believed it meant mischie besetting desire of Halleck, intent on defending Washington. Lee, consummate master of all strategy, no sooner had seen Hooker fairly in pursuit of Ewell than he took his hand off Fredericksburg, and A. P. Hill crossing the mountains marched with Longstreet into Maryland and on to Chambersburg. Hooker's army was in Maryland keeping between Lee and Washington, on June 26th and then Hooker, chafing under Halleck's restrictions and unable to control events, with a great battle in the air, askeHooker, chafing under Halleck's restrictions and unable to control events, with a great battle in the air, asked to be relieved from his command. Sober Meade succeeded him. This changed altogether the current of Lee's movement. Seeing Meade moving northwest from Frederick, intent on loosening his grip from the river, Lee became fearful for his own communica