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The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1863., [Electronic resource] 23 1 Browse Search
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rossed on Monday night several very bright fires were seen on the Falmouth shore. They were of such magnitude as to justify the supposition that immense buildings or stores were consumed. Our men were at a loss to conjecture what was the cause; but some inferred that the enemy was alarmed, under the apprehension of an advance of our forces, and were burning stores. The same evening immense lines of wagons were seen winding along, up the river. These were no doubt conveying provisions for Hooker's army in its new camps. The enemy cannot feel very comfortable in his present position, to which he has been driven. Like some hunted beast he can but feel that he enjoys a temporary respite from his pursuers. Oh! for a gunboat! he no doubt ejaculates. A gunboat to a Yankee in such a strait is the blessedest thing on earth! To McClellan, at Wilcox's wharf, the mailed vessels were like guardian angels. They gave rest and sound sleep to the wounded and wearied Yankees, such as they
General Hooker. Northern papers, noticing the crossing of their army to the south bank of the Rappahannock, are fulsome in their praises of Hooker."With the reins of his command [not "horse"] well in hand, Gen. Hooker rode along the entire liGen. Hooker rode along the entire lines, witnessing the crossing at Kelley's Ford!" says an enthused correspondent. The same faithful chronicler represents the captivated by the prefigured results, and resolved to try Hooker. --What if he was not an honorable gentleman! They all knstics of the North, and therefore not to be objected to in Hooker] But Hooker failed is a different man from Hooker befHooker failed is a different man from Hooker before his failure, and with all the prospective victories he had engaged to win for the Yankees! He will now "get his fairingHooker before his failure, and with all the prospective victories he had engaged to win for the Yankees! He will now "get his fairing" They will all be down upon him. He has disappointed them, and all his faults and deficiencies will be magnified, and he wianother Nebuchadnezzar. The Yankees will be revenged upon Hooker! For his benefit we will relate an anecdote which he may
he several engagements three Major-Generals viz: Slocum, Birney and Howood. Since Monday there has been no heavy fighting on either end of the line. The following telegram from Gen. Lee will beat explain the present whereabouts of the enemy. Chancellorsville May 7, 1862 To His Excellency President Davis: After driving General Sedgwick across the Rappahannock, on the night of the 4th inst. I returned on the 5th to Chancellorsville. The march was delayed by a stores, which continued all night and the following day. In placing the troops in position on the morning of the 6th to attack Gen. Hooker, it was ascertained he had abandoned his fortified position. The line of skirmishers was pressed forward until they came within ange of the enemy's batteries, planted fort of the Rappahannock, which, from the configuration of the ground, completely commenced the side. His army therefore, escaped with the loss of a few additional prisoners. (Signed) R. E. Lee. General.
ivate property and no shells struck the town. --They came on Saturday night, made arrangements to remain, but left Monday night. The Yankees thought their getting Marye's Hill was a trick, and said so in town. They were much frightened, and that officers had hard work to get their men up to the work. They boast of driving Barksdale's men back, though it took ten to one to do it. I'll give you the real facts as soon as they can be got--294 Mississippians killed., wounded, and missing — but they slaughtered the Yankees awfully, and rallied in half a mile to fight again. It was a compliment to expect them and the Washington Artillery to perform impossibilities. The charge of our whole line — Early, Anderson, and McLaw — on Monday evening, was magnificent and decisive. The Yankees retreated, and the survivors escaped across the river. It is reported that Hooker lost a leg. It is a wonderful victory and triumphant repulse of the dastard foe. We occupy our old position once m
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1863., [Electronic resource], Seizures in Tennessee and Kentucky. (search)
Seizures in Tennessee and Kentucky. --A correspondent of the Knoxville Register, writing from near Albany, Ky., April 26th, says: Louisville papers, of the 18th and 21st, contain a list of gentlemen and ladies arrested at Nashville last week, by order of Gen. Mitchell, and lodged in the Penitentiary. Miss Fannie Battle, daughter of the gallant Col. Battle, who is so well known throughout Tennessee, was arrested a few days since and sent to Camp Chase. Also, Miss Hartie Hooker. These arrests were made because they had been furnishing provisions to some of our cavalry stationed in Davidson county. Arbitrary arrests are being made daily, more than was ever known, and that often on the evidence of some refugee negro, or his like, an accursed Abolitionist, and buried, with Jacobinde clangs into some prison. These arrests are not confined alone to Tennessee, out embrace this State, and all State where the most unlimited sentiment of Southern feeling is known or suspicioned o