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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 122 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 2 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beecher, Lyman, 1775-1863 (search)
Beecher, Lyman, 1775-1863 Clergyman; born in New Haven, Conn., Oct. 2, 1775; was graduated at Yale in 1797, and ordained in 1799. In 1832 he accepted the presidency of lance Seminary. Cincinnati, and served the seminary in that capacity twenty years. He had seven sons, all of whom became Congregational clergymen — William, Edward, George. Henry Ward, Charles, Thomas, and James. His daughters were Catharine Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mary Beecher Perkins, and Isabella Beecher Hooker. He died in Brooklyn, Jan. 10, 186
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown's Ferry, seizure of. (search)
Brown's Ferry, seizure of. Gen. G. W. F. Smith undertook to open a more direct way for supplies for the National troops at Chattanooga (q. v.). In cooperation with Hooker's advance on Wauhatchie, he sent General Hazen from Chattanooga, with 1,800 men in bateaux, to construct a pontoon bridge below. These floated noiselessly and undiscerned in the night (Oct. 26-27, 1863) down the Tennessee River, past the point of Lookout Mountain. along a line of Confederate pickets 7 miles in length. T down the north bank of the river to the ferry at about the same time; and by ten o'clock a pontoon bridge was laid, and a strong abatis for defence was constructed. The Confederates, bewildered, withdrew up the valley. Before night the left of Hooker's line rested on Smith's right at the pontoon bridge. By this operation the railway from Bridgeport well up towards Chattanooga was put in possession of the Nationals, and the route for supplies for the troops at the latter place was reduced by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, John, 1825- (search)
Buford, John, 1825- Military officer; born in Kentucky in 1825; was graduated at West Point in 1848; became captain in 1859; and inspector-general, with the rank of major, November, 1861. He commanded a brigade of cavalry under General Hooker, and was so severely wounded near the Rappahannock (August, 1862) that he was reported dead. In the battle of Antietam he was on General McClellan's staff. He was conspicuous in many engagements while in command of the reserve cavalry brigade, and he began the battle of Gettysburg (q. v.). He was chief of Burnside's cavalry, and was assigned to the command of the Army of the Cumberland just before his death in Washington, D. C., Dec. 16, 1863.--His half-brother, Napoleon Bonaparte Buford (born in Woodford county, Ky., Jan. 13, 1807), was also graduated at West Point, and entered the artillery. He was a pupil in the Law School of Harvard University; Professor of Natural Philosophy at West Point; but retired to civil pursuits in 1835. Enga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burnside, Ambrose Everett, 1824-1881 (search)
called to Virginia after the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, and was active and skilful as a corps commander in many of the most important military events of the war. General Burnside served in the campaign in Maryland under McClellan, and was in the battles at South Mountain and Antietam. On Nov. 7, 1862, he superseded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac. Failing of success in his attack upon Lee at Fredericksburg (December, 1862), he resigned, and was succeeded by General Hooker in January, 1863. Assigned to the command of the Department of the Ohio in May, he was active there in suppressing the disloyal elements in that region. In the fall he freed eastern Tennessee of Confederate domination, where he fought Longstreet. He was in command of his old corps (the 9th) in Grant's campaign against Richmond in 1864-65, where he performed important work. He resigned April 15, 1865. In 1866 he was elected governor of Rhode Island, and was twice re-elected. Being i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butterfield, Daniel, 1831- (search)
ry officer; born in Utica, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1831; graduated at Union College in 1849; became brigadier-general of volunteers soon Daniel Butterfield. after the breaking out of the Civil War, and took part in campaigns under Generals McClellan. Burnside, Hooker, and Pope. He was Hooker's chief-of-staff at the battle of Lookout Mountain. At the close of the war he was brevetted major-general for gallant and meritorious service. and was for some years head of the sub-treasury in New York City.ry officer; born in Utica, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1831; graduated at Union College in 1849; became brigadier-general of volunteers soon Daniel Butterfield. after the breaking out of the Civil War, and took part in campaigns under Generals McClellan. Burnside, Hooker, and Pope. He was Hooker's chief-of-staff at the battle of Lookout Mountain. At the close of the war he was brevetted major-general for gallant and meritorious service. and was for some years head of the sub-treasury in New York City.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chancellorsville, battle of (search)
d by the water in the streams. After a pause, Hooker determined to attempt to turn Lee's flank, andso masked by a demonstration on Lee's front by Hooker's left wing, under General Sedgwick, that the tage, with only a part of his troops in hand. Hooker had made his headquarters in the spacious bricng troops. So ended the movements of the day. Hooker's position was a strong one. The National lin Lee was unwilling to risk a direct attack on Hooker, and Jackson advised a secret flank movement with his entire corps, so as to fall on Hooker's rear. Lee hesitated, but so much did he lean on Jacg for more than an hour. During this struggle Hooker had been prostrated, and Couch took command off command. Lee's army was now united, but Hooker's was divided. Sedgwick had seriously menaced Lee's flank, but had not joined Hooker. After a hard conflict and the loss of 1,000 men, Sedgwick nd with. He concentrated his forces to strike Hooker a crushing blow before night, but a heavy rain[14 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chantilly, battle of (search)
to assail and turn Pope's right, he crossed Bull Run at Sudley Ford, and,. after a while, turning to the right, turned down the Little River pike, and marched towards Fairfax Court-house. Pope had prepared to meet this movement. Heintzelman and Hooker were ordered to different points, and just before sunset Reno met Jackson's advance (Ewell and Hill) near Chantilly. A cold and drenching rain was falling, but it did not prevent an immediate engagement. Very soon McDowell, Hooker, and Kearny cHooker, and Kearny came to Reno's assistance. A very severe battle raged for some time, when Gen. Isaac J. Stevens, leading Reno's second division in person, was shot dead. His command fell back in disorder. Seeing this, Gen. Philip Kearny advanced with his division and renewed the action, sending Birney's brigade to the front. A furious thunderstorm was then raging, which made the use of ammunition very difficult. Unheeding this, Kearny brought forward a battery and planted it in position himself. Then, per
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
uns, and another laden with tents and baggage, and, proceeding up the Yazoo River, captured a Confederate battery of four guns, with a large quantity of powder, shot, shells, and grape.—27. Skirmish near Rienzi, Miss. Confederates routed by General Hooker at Kettle Run, near Manassas, Va.—28. Battle near Centreville, Va., by Nationals under McDowell and Sigel, and Confederates under Jackson, when the latter were defeated with a loss of 1,000 made prisoners and many arms. Skirmish near Woodbuconsuls of England and Austria dismissed from the Confederacy.—15. President Lincoln calls for 100,000 men to repel invasion.—19. Confederate invasion of Indiana.—21. Confederate cavalry defeated at Aldie Gap, Va.—28. General Meade succeeded General Hooker in the command of the Army of the Potomac. Bridge over the Susquehanna burned. The authorities of the city of Philadelphia petition the President to relieve General McClellan of command.—30. Martial law proclaimed in Baltimore.—Ju
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cotton, John 1585-1652 (search)
ore Archbishop Laud, when he fled to America, arriving in Boston in September, 1633. He was soon afterwards ordained a colleague with Mr. Wilson in the Boston Church. His ministry there for nineteen years was so influential that he has been called The patriarch of New England. He was a firm opponent of Roger Williams, and defended the authority of ministers and magistrates. He and Davenport were invited to assist in the assembly of divines at Westminster, but were dissuaded from going by Hooker. He died in Boston, Dec. 23, 1652. God's promise to his plantations.— The following sermon, to which a large historical importance has been given, was preached in England, as a farewell address to Winthrop's Massachusetts Company (see Winthrop, John), and the first London edition of it was published in 1630: 2 Sam. 7. 10. Moreover I will appoint a place for my people Israell, and I will plant them, that they may dwell in a place of their owne, and move no more. In the beginning
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Couch, Darius Nash 1822-1897 (search)
3, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1846; served in the war with Mexico; aided in suppressing the last outbreak of the Seminoles, and resigned in 1855. In January, 1861, while residing in Taunton, Mass., he was commissioned colonel of a Massachusetts regiment, and made a brigadier-general of volunteers in August. He commanded a division in General Keyes's corps in the battle of fair Oaks, or seven Pines (q. v.). He also distinguished himself at Williamsburg and at Malvern Hills, and on July 4, 1862, was promoted to major-general. Soon after his service at Antietam he was put in command of Sumner's corps, and took a prominent part in battles under Burnside and Hooker; also under Thomas, in the defeat of Hood at Nashville (q. v.), and in North Carolina early in 1865. He was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts in 1865; was collector of the port of Boston in 1866-67; adjutant-general of Connecticut in 1883-84. He died in Norwalk, Conn., Feb. 12, 1897.
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