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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 769 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 457 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 436 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 431 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 371 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 295 5 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 277 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 234 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 203 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 180 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Hooker or search for Joseph Hooker in all documents.

Your search returned 102 results in 5 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
offensive, an effort is made to silence his demands by the promise of a commission as major-general in the regular army if he would win a victory before Grant and Hooker—a humiliating offer which he rejects with contempt. When he is at last enabled to oppose about six thousand cavalry to the eight thousand horse of the enemy's o were in command of these corps, left on the following morning the banks of the Rapidan, and conducted their troops to the capital, where they were joined by General Hooker, their new chief. Numerous trains were also in readiness to convey these twenty thousand men, with their artillery, ammunition, and baggage, by way of Cincin confusion which had marked the earlier days was succeeded by a well-regulated system, of which the Federal armies at last reaped the fruit. The orders issued to Hooker forbade him to go beyond Bridgeport, but to defend to the last the railroad between this point and Nashville while waiting for the time when direct communications
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
reports brought in by his cavalry, has ignored Hooker's movement; he has even refused to credit the instead of marching the Tennessee Army against Hooker, there was adopted a singular plan, at once tiout Mountain, the Federal trains, protected by Hooker, pass with impunity at the foot of the mountaie, so as to replace Osterhaus, and had ordered Hooker to keep Osterhaus with him if the crossing wasley. Adding Osterhaus' division to these two, Hooker would be in command of seven brigades. In t prescribed to Hooker into a serious attack. Hooker was to try and take the crest which rises fiveould scatter if they move forward too rapidly, Hooker has ordered his lieutenants to halt after haviake, by the rear, between the two escarpments, Hooker's entire army. In order to execute this chimeeak the line of communication with Sherman and Hooker. The first will have only to recross the Tennconsiderable; he left 230 men and two flags in Hooker's hands. While the latter was thus checked,[83 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
ce, the other corps hold themselves in readiness to support him and prevent Bragg from taking, in his turn, the Knoxville road. It is, then, necessary to watch the latter closely, without allowing one's self to be carried away in pursuit of him. Hooker will remain at Ringgold until the evening of November 30th, avoiding an engagement with the enemy if the latter remains quiet, but ready to attack him vigorously if he proceeds to Cleveland, or to push as far as Dalton if he evacuate that point. town. His columns, which are following only one road along the railway, by Cleveland and Tyner's Station, reach on the 16th and 17th the battlefield of November 24th. Davis' division is immediately returned to the Fourteenth corps: Howard joins Hooker in Will's Valley; and Blair, meeting with his fourth division under Osterhaus, conducts the Fifteenth corps to Bridgeport, where Sherman has established his headquarters. Grant has resolved to scatter his armies during the bad season in order th
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
signated by Thomas for this operation could not set off until the 22d of February. No important change has taken place in the position of the Federal troops since they have taken up their winter quarters. The Eleventh and Twelfth corps, under Hooker, are established between Bridgeport—where they support Logan—and Chattanooga. The Fourteenth corps has its quarters east of this city. The Fourth corps occupies the entire lower part of East Tennessee, from Cleveland, where Stanley's division, of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, General Halleck had turned his attention to the vast regions extending west of the Mississippi. This was persisting in the plan which had already caused him to fall into so many errors, and of which his quarrel with Hooker regarding the occupation of Harper's Ferry is a striking example: it was forgetting once more that everywhere in the fields contended for by two armies, as in the ensemble of the operations that cover a whole continent, the combatants should ende
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
an Bridges. 6th Ohio BatteryLieut. Oliver H. P. Ayres. 20th Ohio Battery Temporarily attached from the Artillery reserve.Capt. Edward Grosskopff. Pennsylvania Light, Battery BLieut. Samuel M. McDowell. Eleventh army corps. Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker, commanding Eleventh and Twelfth army corps, had under his immediate command the first division, Fourth corps; the Second division, Twelfth corps; portions of the Fourteenth corps, and the first division, Fifteenth corps. Company K, 15th Illinois cavalry, Capt. Samuel B. Sherer, served as escort to Gen. Hooker. Maj.-gen. Oliver O. Howard. General headquarters. Independent Company 8th New York Infantry, Capt. Anton Bruhn. Second division. Brig.-gen. Adolph von Steinwehr. First Brigade. Col. Adolphus Buschbeck. 33d New JerseyCol. George W. Mindil. 134th New YorkLieut.-col. Allan H. Jackson. 154th New YorkCol. Patrick H. Jones. 27th PennsylvaniaMaj. Peter A. McAloon. Capt. August Reidt. 73d PennsylvaniaLi