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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
e direction of McCall's line, and somewhat overlapped by it, but five hundred yards distant, was Hooker's division of Heintzelman's corps covering the Quaker road, which ran parallel to it several hund about seven thousand. The greater part of the four divisions of Kearney, McCall, Sedgwick and Hooker were engaged on the Yankee side, averaging ten thousand each. Early on the morning of the 30te were captured. A large part of those captured fell into the hands of a brigade (probably of Hooker's division) which was in the very wood from which Kemper started, its line of battery being perplank and rear, and might probably have resulted in their capture by some troops, apparently from Hooker's line, who advanced with a battery from the direction of Willis Church and had nearly attained visions being in the following order from its left to right, viz: Sykes, Morell, Couch, Kearney, Hooker, Sedgwick, Richardson, Smith, Slocum and Peck. McCall was in reserve, in rear of Sykes and More
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2.12 (search)
his behavior upon the right of Jackson at Fredericksburg? Of Chancellorsville, where an eye-witness asserts that he could not get rid of the idea that Harry of Navarre was present, except that Stuart's plume was black; for everywhere, like Navarre, he was in front, and the men followed the feather ? And where, riding at the head of and in command of Jackson's veterans, his ringing voice could be heard high, high above the thunder of artillery and the ceaseless roar of musketry, singing, Old Joe Hooker, won't you come out the wilderness ? Of the 9th of June, at Beverly's Ford; of Brandy Station; of Gettysburg; of his action during the memorable early days of May, 1864; of his last official dispatch, dated May 11, 1864, 6.30 A. M., where he was fighting against the immense odds of Sheridan, preventing them from occupying this city, and where he said, My men and horses are tired, hungry and jaded, but all right? Of Yellow Tavern, fought six miles from here, where his mortal wound was re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of Bates' battle of Gettysburg. (search)
rg, he has hardly deigned to notice the Confederate sources of information at all. His estimate of General Lee's force is derived entirely from the guesses of Generals Hooker and Meade. General Hooker says, according to Dr. Bates: With regard to the enemy's force, I had reliable information. Two Union men had counted them as they General Hooker says, according to Dr. Bates: With regard to the enemy's force, I had reliable information. Two Union men had counted them as they passed through Hagerstown, and in order that there might be no mistake, they compared notes every night, and if their counts differed, they were satisfactorily adjusted by compromise. In round numbers, Lee had 91,000 infantry and 280 pieces of artillery; marching with that column were about 6,000 cavalry. He adds that Stuart's c which conflicts (as will be shown) with all the other Confederate authorities, and is certainly erroneous. The attempt of Dr. Bates to reconcile the estimate of Hooker and Meade, with the alleged statement of Longstreet, leads to an amusing calculation. Having ciphered the Federal army from 95,000 to 72,000, by comparing Butter
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 20: (search)
Chapter 20: The spring campaign of 1863: camp near Culpepper. fights on the Rappahannock. visit of a Prussian officer. rides in the neighbourhood. Hooker's advance and flank march. night-fight near Tod's Tavern. On our arrival at Culpepper we found it greatly improved in aspect. True, the roads were still nearly impassable; but the country round, under the influence of frequent rains and the mild air of April, had clothed itself in tender verdure, interspersed here and ther our kind friends in the neighbourhood did their best to keep the mess-table of the General and his Staff copiously supplied. In the mean time, after the battle of Fredericksburg, the supreme command had been transferred into the hands of General Hooker, an officer who had gained a high reputation by his gallantry-he was nicknamed by his men Fighting Joe --and the good management of his division, but who eventually proved himself to be utterly incapable of commanding a large army. Great cre
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 22: (search)
the hottest fire I heard him, to an old melody, hum the words, Old Joe Hooker get out of the Wilderness. After a raging conflict, protracteral hundreds, the majority of whom perished. In this building General Hooker had fixed his headquarters, and hence he had directed the battly ourselves along the muddy road, leaving everybody behind. General Hooker had done wonders amidst the difficulties of this wild entangledtile batteries; but soon even these parting tokens of farewell from Hooker's great army were discontinued, and, vanishing entirely, it ceased sion of defeats, and all his plans and combinations frustrated, General Hooker had already on the previous day determined to withdraw his trooar circumstances, entirely escaped in vigilance of our pickets. As Hooker was retracing his course back towards his old position near Falmout that time there was every prospect of his speedy recovery. General Hooker, after all his disasters, had the audacity to speak of his oper
s full of hissing balls and bursting shell, he would hum his gay songs. In Culpeper the infantry were electrified by the laughter and singing of Stuart as he led them in the charge; and at Chancellorsville, where he commanded Jackson's corps after that great man's fall, the infantry veterans as they swept on, carrying line after line of breastworks at the point of the bayonet, saw his plume floating in front-like Henry of Navarre's, one of them said-and heard his sonorous voice singing, Old Joe Hooker, will you come out of the Wilderness! This curious spirit of boyish gaiety did not characterize him on certain occasions only, but went with him always, surrounding every movement of the man with a certain atmosphere of frolic and abandon. Immense animal health and strength danced in his eyes, gave elasticity to the motions of his person, and rang in his contagious laughter. It was hard to realize that anything could hurt this powerful machine, or that death could ever come to him;
erever he moved among the camps he was met by cheers; and so unvarying was this reception of him, that a distant yell would often draw from his men the exclamation, That's Jackson or a rabbit! the sight of the soldier or the appearance of a hare being alone adequate to arouse this tremendous excitement. From the day of Cold Harbour, success continued to crown him-at Cedar Mountain, the second Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, where he met the full weight of McClellan's right wing under Hooker, and repulsed it, and Chancellorsville. When he died, struck down by the hands of his own men, he was the most famous and the most beloved of Southern commanders. Ii. His popularity was great in degree, but more singular in character. No general was ever so beloved by the good and pious of the land. Old ladies received him wherever he went with a species of enthusiasm, and I think he preferred their society and that of clergymen to any other. In such society his kindly nature seeme
formation from his scouts. Silent, puzzled, and doubtful, the General walked up and down, knitting his brows and reflecting, when the lithe figure of Mosby appeared, and Stuart uttered an exclamation of relief and satisfaction. They were speedily in private consultation, and Mosby only came out again to mount his quick gray mare and set out, in a heavy storm, for the Federal camps. On the next day he returned with information which put the entire cavalry in motion. He had penetrated General Hooker's camps, ascertained everything, and safely returned. This had been done in his gray uniform, with his pistols at his belt-and I believe it was on this occasion that he gave a characteristic evidence of his coolness. He had captured a Federal cavalry-man, and they were riding on together, when suddenly they struk a column of the enemy's cavalry passing. Mosby drew his oil-cloth around him, cocked his pistol, and said to his companion, If you make any sign or utter a word to have me ca
of the future. After the crushing defeat of Chancellorsville, General Hooker cut behind him the pontoons covered with pine boughs, to deadenl and Confederate armies. It was a matter of grave importance that Hooker should undo the designs of Lee; and mighty efforts were made to burRoads villagers — was doubling on the track; he was going after General Hooker, then in the vicinity of Manassas, and thencewhither? We bilumns moved; and that evening we had passed around Manassas, where Hooker's rear force still lingered, and were approaching Fairfax Station t steadily towards the Potomac, intelligence having arrived that General Hooker's main body had passed that river at Leesburg. What would Stuald reply to that question. Cross at Leesburg? To merely follow up Hooker while Hooker followed up Lee, was very unlike Stuart. Strike acrosHooker followed up Lee, was very unlike Stuart. Strike across for the Blue Ridge, and cross at Shepherdstown? That would lose an immense amount of invaluable time and horse-flesh. Cross below Leesbur
rth bank of the Rappahannock, and on the first of May, General Hooker, its commander, had crossed, and firmly established hi fords. This latter was compelled to fall back before General Hooker's army of about one hundred and fifty thousand men, ance force under Jackson, on the same evening, attacked General Hooker's intrenchments facing toward Fredericksburg. They wefront, and a determined attack upon the right flank of General Hooker, west of Chancellorsville. The ground on his left andtoward the south, and it was afterward discovered that General Hooker supposed him to be in full retreat upon Richmond. Suchd of his column northward, and rapidly advanced around General Hooker's right flank. A cavalry force under General Stuart hion, extending his left, and placing that wing between General Hooker and the Rappahannock. Then, unless the Federal commanStuart, who had succeeded him in command, was pressing General Hooker back toward the Rappahannock. His soul must have thri
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