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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 33 1 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 16: Atlanta campaign-battles about Kenesaw Mountain. June, 1864. (search)
nding by the road-side, and I there showed General Schofield Hooker's signal-message of the day before. He wa sally of the enemy struck his troops before it did Hooker's; that General Hooker knew of it at the time; and General Hooker knew of it at the time; and he offered to go out and show me that the dead men of his advance division (Hascall's) were lying farther out than any of Hooker's. General Hooker pretended not to have known this fact. I then asked him why he had calleGeneral Hooker pretended not to have known this fact. I then asked him why he had called on me for help, until he had used all of his own troops; asserting that I had just seen Butter-field's divisk handsomely. As we rode away from that church General Hooker was by my side, and I told him that such a thindemanded, and from that time he began to sulk. General Hooker had come from the East with great fame as a figd dead on the ground. Yesterday the extreme right (Hooker and Schofield) advanced on the Powder Springs road 2,144 Fourteenth (Palmer)3531,4661,819 Twentieth (Hooker)3221,2461,568 Total, Army of the Cumberland1,2774,
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
d. I soon learned that the enemy had made a furious sally, the blow falling on Hooker's corps (the Twentieth), and partially on Johnson's division of the Fourteenth,were light, for they had partially covered their fronts with light parapet; but Hooker's whole corps fought in open ground, and lost about fifteen hundred men. He repnth deployed on its left. Schofield was next on his right, then came Howard's, Hooker's, and Palmer's corps, on the extreme right. Each corps was deployed with stron that General Howard had been chosen to command the Army of the Tennessee, General Hooker applied to General Thomas to be relieved of the command of the Twentieth Coe time when the Eleventh and Twelfth were united and made the Twentieth. General Hooker was offended because he was not chosen to succeed McPherson; but his chancelenty of hard fighting ahead, and that all honors had to be fairly earned. General Hooker, moreover, when he got back to Cincinnati, reported (I was told) that we ha
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
ut he will lose the respect of all honest, high-minded patriots, by his affiliation with such traitors and Copperheads as B----, V----, W----, S----, & Co. He would not stand upon the traitorous Chicago platform, but he had not the manliness to oppose it. A major-general in the United States Army, and yet not one word to utter against rebels or the rebellion I I had much respect for McClellan before he became a politician, but very little after reading his letter accepting the nomination. Hooker certainly made a mistake in leaving before the capture of Atlanta. I understand that, when here, he said that you would fail; your army was discouraged and dissatisfied, etc., etc. He is most unmeasured in his abuse of me. I inclose you a specimen of what he publishes in Northern papers, wherever he goes. They are dictated by himself and written by W. B. and such worthies. The funny part of the business is, that I had nothing whatever to do with his being relieved on either occasion. Mor
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 24: conclusion — military lessons of the War. (search)
in time of war, because in peace these same men gain all the necessary experience, possess all the daring and courage of soldiers, and only need the occasional protection and assistance of the necessary train-guard, which may be composed of the furloughed men coming and going, or of details made from the local garrisons to the rear. For the transfer of large armies by rail, from one theatre of action to another by the rear — the cases of the transfer of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps--General Hooker, twenty-three thousand men — from the East to Chattanooga, eleven hundred and ninety-two miles in seven days, in the fall of 1863; and that of the Army of the Ohio--General Schofield, fifteen thousand men — from the valley of the Tennessee to Washington, fourteen hundred miles in eleven days, en route to North Carolina in January, 1865, are the best examples of which I have any knowledge, and reference to these is made in the report of the Secretary of War, Mr. Stanton, dated November 22<