Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

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First and Ninth corps, under Generals Reno and Hooker, forming the right wing under General Burnsideable misfortune. About three o'clock P. M., Hooker's corps, of Burnside's column, moved up to thes to the Mountain House, on the main road. Gen. Hooker sent Meade, with the division of Pennsylvane mountain sides thus gallantly passed over by Hooker on the right of the gap and Reno on the left, untains, the cavalry, and the corps of Sumner, Hooker and Mansfield were ordered to pursue them via e attack. On the afternoon of the sixteenth Hooker's corps, consisting of Ricketts's and Doubledaennsylvania reserves, which was at the head of Hooker's corps, became engaged in a sharp contest wited between Hooker and the enemy in his front. Hooker's attack was successful for a time, but masses checked it. Mansfield brought up his corps to Hooker's support, when the two corps drove the enemy n Mansfield losing his life in the effort. Gen. Hooker was, unhappily, about this time wounded, an[4 more...]
r our heads. In two hours the broad fields on the south bank were swarming with Union soldiers drawn in line of battle. Hooker's and Franklin's grand divisions crossed below the city. The rebels occasionally opened their batteries from the mountaiscover his unhappiness. The army of the Potomac is composed of three grand divisions, commanded by Sumner, Franklin, and Hooker. Each grand division is divided into corps; each corps into divisions; each division into brigades; the brigades, of cou wind. At this time on the high, clear plain, this side the Rappahannock, and north-easterly from Fredericksburgh, was Hooker's grand division, drawn up in war's magnificently stern array, presenting a most superb and redoubtable appearance. An autes. I looked at my watch. Gen. Burnside put every man into action that went in at South-Mountain — that is, Reno's and Hooker's corps. Franklin took his in at Crampton's Gap. Tell----he must send me those boots, or I will be barefooted. I am qu
forward, to fire, as was expected, into the enemy's flank. Across, or to the east of, the railroad, on the extreme confederate right, General J. E. B. Stuart, with his cavalry and horse-artillery, covered the flank of the confederate line, his rear almost resting upon Massaponax Creek. As regards the disposition of the Federal troops, nothing more is known than that the three great bodies of troops were commanded, that on the Federal right by Gen. Sumner, that on the Federal centre by Gen. Hooker, and that on the Federal left by Gen. Franklin. It is estimated that not less than forty thousand troops were engaged in the attack directed by Gen. Sumner, and that fifty thousand were employed upon the Federal centre and left. Friday, the twelfth of December, was employed by the Federal generals in arranging and massing their troops for the next day's attack. Active skirmishing was kept up by the pickets on both sides for several hours; and in the afternoon, with a view to feeling
orps of McDowell and Sigel, and the Pennsylvania reserves, under Reynolds, were pushed forward to Gainesville; Reno and Kearny were directed upon Greenwich, while Hooker's division was sent against Ewell along the railroad. Unfortunately, however, the movement was too late, as a large detachment of Lee's army was already east of Thoroughfare Gap. Hooker encountered the enemy near Kettle Run, and a sharp engagement ensued. This gallant division drove Ewell a distance of five miles, the enemy leaving their dead, and many of their wounded, on the field. As McDowell, Sigel, and Reynolds had reached their positions, there was now every prospect that Jacksonnd Bull Run, the enemy not attempting any pursuit. Two days later, however, he threw a considerable force between Chantilly and Germantown to turn Pope's right. Hooker dislodged them after a short but severe engagement, in which Brig.-Gens. Kearny and Stevens, two of our very best officers, were killed. Pope's army had been ree
should be crossed at or near Fredericksburgh. Five pontoon-bridges were to be thrown across the river — the first at the Lacey House, which lies directly opposite the end of the main street of Fredericksburgh, half a mile below Falmouth; the second and third within a few hundred yards from the first. The remaining two were to be thrown over a mile and a half or two miles further down the stream, and on these the grand division of Gen. Franklin--the left — would cross, while Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions — right and centre — would use the three upper ones. It was about three o'clock this morning when the boats were unshipped from the teams at the river's brink. Swiftly and silently the Engineer Corps proceeded to their work. A dense fog filled the valleys and water margin, through which the bridge-builders appeared as spectral forms. The recital of the Times special correspondent with the left will inform you of the details of the construction of the two lower — Fr
was at work throwing up rifle-pits. On Monday, at one o'clock, the troops were set in motion, Hooker's command moving in column up by one road, Franklin's by another. It was a march of but ten or system of strategic movements. Our hope was that we should surprise the enemy at Banks's Ford. Hooker's and Franklin's grand divisions would then be thrown across the river, while at the same time oeight of metal would carry the day. Early in the forenoon I rode up to the headquarters of Gens. Hooker and Franklin, about two miles from Banks's Ford. The night's rain had made deplorable havoc ments that had been made. It was designed that Franklin's column should advance by one road and Hooker's by another. But, by mistake, a portion of the troops of the left grand division debouched into the road assigned to the centre, and cutting in between two divisions of one of Hooker's corps, threw every thing into confusion. In consequence, the woods and roads have for the past two days been
avalry force in the direction of Culpeper, to reconnoitre, and, if possible, to intercept a body of rebels, known to be in the neighborhood of Warrenton. The expedition returned to-night, the men being much exhausted after their severe labors, but elated and flushed with the excitement which accompanies victory. Learning that both Stuart and Lee had left the main body of the rebel army near Fredericksburgh, for the purpose of enforcing the draft in Fauquier and the adjoining counties, Gen. Hooker determined to send out a large body of cavalry to cut them off, and at the same time to ascertain the position of the rebel forces on the other side of the Rappahannock. The regiments chosen for this important enterprise were the First and Fifth regulars, commanded by Captain Reno; the Thirty-fourth and Sixteenth Pennsylvania, Col. McIntosh; the First Rhode Island, Fourth New-York, and Sixth Ohio, Colonel Duffie; and the Sixth New-York flying battery, of six guns — all under the command
and stated to them the reasons which led him to surrender, and at the close the men gave three tremendous cheers for Colonel Streight, which clearly showed their confidence in him as a leader. The officers and men were taken to Rome, Georgia, where they went through the farce of paroling. On our journey to Richmond, and while there, we were treated very much as our numerous predecessors. On Saturday, the twenty-fourth, the surgeons and chaplains of this brigade, with the officers of Hooker's army, were sent into our lines via Fortress Monroe. Colonel Streight and the officers of his command are still held, and it is said they intend to hold them as long as possible. The loss of the brigade in this engagement was twelve killed and sixty-nine wounded. Most of the officers were in good health, and hopeful that the Government would not let them remain there long. Captain Brown and other officers of the Indianola are in Washington. More anon. George J. Frenyear, Fifty-fi
ia Volunteers. Congratulatory order of General Hooker. headquarters of the army of the Potoceeded in halting and rallying the corps. General Hooker had located General Berry in the rear in o. Between two and three in the morning, General Hooker settled upon a rearrangement of his lines,Second corps, now commanded by Hancock. General Hooker kept his headquarters at Chancellorsville,bout a two-storied white house near which were Hooker's headquarters, upon the Ely's Ford road not f Slocum extending one division south of it. Hooker selected his old case hardened corps to meet tre fresh. The enemy had gained ground because Hooker had planned and had fought a defensive battle,n with a portion of the force would have given Hooker additional power to crush Jackson. I have no ensive scale, and fronted in every direction. Hooker's plan seems to have been to ditch to Richmondt of this great transaction. It was here that Hooker had his headquarters, and it is here that he w[30 more...]
n P. Owen Jones, Captain Armstrong, and Captain McIrvin, Doctor Hackley and Lieutenant Estis, especially the latter, who volunteered to carry a despatch to Major-General Hooker. He failed in the attempt, but with his escort of ten men he captured and paroled one major, two captains, a lieutenant, and fifteen men. He was afterwardched Kelly's Ford in safety. On Thursday, just after crossing Raccoon Ford, General Stoneman sent Lieutenant Sumner, of his staff, as bearer of despatches to Gen. Hooker, with whom he had not communicated since the twenty-ninth ultimo. Taking with him an escort of sixteen men, Lieutenant Sumner went to the Germanna bridge, with the individual before him was a live Yankee, for the first time flashed across his mind. He at once concluded that General Lee must have been defeated, and that Hooker was marching on Richmond. Having secured the horses, the Yankees rejoined the main body, who were drawn up in line on the pike in front of the house. The Yankee
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