Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
R. F. Ligon and Lieutenants Geo. Jones and Zuber, returned to Alabama. April 29. This day twelve months ago I was assigned to duty as 2nd lieutenant in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States. To-day we are hurriedly notified that General Hooker, the successor of the unsuccessful Burnsides, has effected a landing near Fredericksburg, and Rodes' old brigade, under Colonel E. A. Neal of 26th Alabama is ordered to meet them. My duties as acting quartermaster, (Aqm,) require me to have urg & Potomac R. R., and drew up in line of battle, while our wagon train moved a mile, and remained until 12 o'clock, midnight, and then moved to Guinea's station May i, 1863. Remained all day in great expectancy from so-called Fighting Joe Hooker, who succeeded Burnside. We feel that he is no match for Rodes, Jackson and Lee. Battle of Chancellorsville began. May 2. Rested until night, when we were ordered to move, as rapidly as possible, our trains to Bowling Green. To-day the g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
as but one road by which he could escape and that is known as the James river road which was occupied at that time by General Hooker with a large Federal force. Stuart passed rapidly through treacherous bogs and estuaries on the north side of the Ch was thrillingly perilous, and that was when he approached the locality of White Oak Swamp, for this was occupied by General Hooker, who held a position on the extreme left of the Federal army, extending within a very short distance of James river, and there was but one public highway between Hooker and the river, and this was the road this fearless cavalryman was upon and the only one by which he could reach the Confederate lines. Hooker could have closed this avenue easily had he been aware Hooker could have closed this avenue easily had he been aware of his approach; but there was no demonstration whatever as this bold raider dashed into the lines of his friends with laughter and a merry twinkle in his eye. This feat has now placed him in a friendly and genial atmosphere; but he still has fifteen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
of our Army of the Tennessee were ever turned by reason of the cavalry giving away. Do you recall the battle of New Hope Church? I had the honor on that occasion, to carry the news to our gallant Kelley, and to the immortal Pat Cleburne, that Hooker's corps was then in the woods, advancing on the line then held by Wheeler's cavalry dismounted, with no entrenchments and breastworks whatever. On that occasion the fight was made principally by Cleburne's Division and Wheeler's Cavalry, and HooHooker's Corps was driven in confusion from the field, and in this battle more men were left dead upon the field than were killed during the entire war between Spain and the United States. During the battle of Murfreesboro, Wheeler's cavalry more than once, made a complete circuit of Rosecrans' entire army, destroying practically every wagon and team that he had, making it absolutely impossible for Rosecrans to make an attempt to follow Bragg for more than twenty-four hours after Bragg had retre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
time spread through the camps. As soon as the telegraph lines were cut it was noticed to McClellan that Stuart was in his rear. General Ingalls, who was in command at the White House, says that he received a telegram from McClellan warning him of danger. It is a mystery that McClellan, knowing that it must be impossible for Stuart to retreat up the Pamunkey, should have made no attempt to capture him when returning up the James. To have done so he would only have had to spread a wing. Hooker's division was camped in three or four miles of the only road on which he could escape. The guard at Tunstall's didn't even have their guns loaded. In order to return to Richmond it was necessary to make a complete circle of McClellan's army and go up the left bank of the James. Of course, it was taken for granted that a large force would be sent in pursuit. Panic reigned. As some evidence of the panic that reigned, I will mention the fact that after we had passed Royall's camp a bo