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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
Stuart was too far away and the Blue Ridge and Hooker's army was between them. This is a denial of n suggesting to Stuart to cross the Potomac in Hooker's rear. He quotes from this letter of June 23ed in reply to his letter of the 22nd that General Hooker's army was still inactive, although Mosby Of the movements of Longstreet and Hill while Hooker was still lying quiet south of the river, of wot through. The preservation of the status in Hooker's army depended on Lee. At that time the desigt would have crossed the Potomac in advance of Hooker's army early in the evening of the 25th, and tcross the Potomac prematurely, and thereby set Hooker's army in motion, which delayed Stuart's cross* * * * When I got back from my trip inside Hooker's lines with my drove of mules, Stuart told me that General Lee was anxious to know if Hooker's army was moving to cross the Potomac. He did not General Lee. * * * * The information was that Hooker's army was still resting in the camps where it[20 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
his instructions, but that his detour between Hooker's army and the city of Washington, was justifich other on the banks of the Rappahannock: General Hooker's correspondence at that time shows that no the hazard of another forward move, and when Hooker inquired of headquarters whether it would be wto do so. It would appear from this, that General Hooker's confidence in himself had either been de more uncertain our future movements. To draw Hooker still further away from his base, however, andsted, as the whole army could perform with General Hooker in its front. Not knowing what force theruart and Mosby never took place. Stuart found Hooker's army in motion and Hancock's corps in possese wished to mark the effect of the movement on Hooker, but Hooker remained quiet, and Ewell maintain. This seems to have been the last straw with Hooker to break the camel's back. On returning to hiisers, the President selected Meade to succeed Hooker, and an order was immediately prepared to that[48 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ell: I wrote you last night stating that Gen. Hooker was reported to have crossed the Potomac anwith the scout who brought the intelligence of Hooker's movements. Even if the dispatch was not send and stated that the news of the proximity of Hooker should have been brought by a scout on the 28tgranted that Lee knew on the 27th of June that Hooker had crossed the Potomac, this fact would not aommanding Cavalry: General, * * * If General Hooker's army remains inactive you can leave two oss east of the Blue Ridge and pass in rear of Hooker's army, it was evidently the intention that heecondary and incidental object of damaging General Hooker's communications and making a raid around rches if that was his objective. He knew that Hooker had crossed the Potomac and was marching north's trains, or to damage the canal, or to break Hooker's communication with Washington, or to burn th that on June 28th, General Lee still believed Hooker had not crossed the Potomac; that he issued or[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
, and consequently did not reach Gettysburg until a late hour. Now, General Lee left ie entirely to the discretion of his subordinate, when he might have given a peremptory order. Of course, that grand man is to magnanimous to blame him for the way he exercised this discretion. The responsibility placed upon General Ewell was tremendous. Instead of blaming him, for he says: It was ascertained from the prisoners that we had been engaged with two corps of the army formerly commanded by General Hooker, and the remainder of that army, under General Meade, was approaching Gettysburg. Without information as to its proximity, the strong position which the enemy had assumed could not be attacked without danger of exposing the four divisions present, already weakened and exhausted by a long and bloody struggle, to overwhelming numbers of fresh troops. General Hill says: My own two divisions being exhausted by six hours hard fighting, prudence led me to be content with what had been gain
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
s. Frances B., 355. Gorgas, Gen. Josiah 2 16. Gorgas Col. W. C., 17. Grandstaff, Lieut. D. W., 366. Greely Horace, asked to bring about speedy trial of Jefferson Davis, 214, 252. Grimes', Battery, Centennial of, 169. Hampton Gen. Wade, 35. Halleck, Gen. 99. Harrison, Capt. Carter B., 56 Heckman's Brigade? Who captured, 181. Heth, Gen., intended to cover his error, 369. Hodges, Col. James G., 184; where he fell, 195. Hoffman, Fred., of Color Guard, 275. Hooker. Gen. Joseph, 82,98. Huidekoper, H. S, 290. Huse, Col. Caleb, 2. Iron-clad car exploded by shot, 354. Iverson, Gen. A., 17. Johnson's Division, 173. Johnson, Capt. Elliot, 213. Johnston, Gen., 18. Jones' Battalion of Artillery, 328. Jones, Col. Beuhring, 349. Jones Col. H. P., 176, Jones, Lieut. J. Pembroke, 51. Kane, Dr. E. K., 42 Kieffer, Henry M., 299. Kenny, Lt. Col., 16. Lamb, Col. Wm., 3. Lawson. Gallant exploit of Capt. Campbell. 320.