Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

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l should be called the Battle of the Wilderness. The matter of fact, however, is stronger than anything else in behalf of the name. The great battle was really fought in the Wilderness--a country of gravelly clay soil, and a black-jack growth, presenting in many places an almost impenetrable thicket. There were occasional small openings of cleared and cultivated fields, in which the enemy had his works for defence.--The position was one of great strength and was very probably alluded to by Hooker a short time since as one he knew of, from which the whole Confederate army could not dislodge him. If he thought he knew such an one he would certainly go to it, and no doubt did, in preference to all others accessible to him. It was indeed a strong one. Yet Jackson's impetuous charge in the very jaws of death, as it were, could not be resisted by the Yankees, and they were driven from it. The name "Wilderness" will perpetuate the nature of the position thus heroically stormed and carried
Affairs on the Rappahannock. During the day, yesterday, we had various rumors in circulation throughout the city with reference to the movements of the enemy on the Rappahannock--one of them to the effect that Hooker, having been heavily reinforced, was throwing his columns across the river at Port Royal, Caroline county, about twenty miles below Fredericksburg. The information received from passengers on the train last night contradicts this rumor, and if we may credit the reports brought down by this source, everything is in a state of quiet, with no probability of an immediate advance. For several days past large fires have been observed, and black columns of smoke seen ascending on the Stafford side, which we think rather indicates a retrograde than a forward movement. Hooker does not perhaps feel very secure on the South side of the Potomac since his late defeat, and it is by no means improbable that he is destroying stores with a view to fall back upon Washington.
From the North. The standard by which to judge General Booker The New York Tribune, printing General Hooker's evidence before the Congressional committee on the conduct of the war, with reference to McClellan and Burnside's campaigns, says: late it. On the general conduct of his campaigns, and on the half-dozen most conspicuous instances of his incapacity, General Hooker's testimony is equally conclusive — more so than anything we know of except McClellan's own account. If there be stiehalf. If that does not convince him, his insanity may be set down as hopeless. Aside from its historical value, Gen. Hooker's evidence has a special interest at this moment when he is in command of the Army of the Potomac, and supposed to be ly by local subscription. These subscriptions, be it remembered, were made directly in the face of the intelligence from Hooker's army. Who can doubt that the patriotism of the masses will yet, properly directed, bring the nation safely through its