Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joe Hooker or search for Joe Hooker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
fterward his foe and opponent on a wider arena of battle to do justice to his coolness and bravery, and the testimony is all the movie grateful because it is the tribute of one great and large-hearted soldier to another. General (then Captain) Joe Hooker, afterward distinguished as the fighting general of the Federal army in the civil war, thus describes the action of General Johnston, and his coolness and power of control in arresting the rapid withdrawal of the Ohio regiment across the cornfield, in full range of the enemy's guns, and reforming it under the chapparal wall and successfully repulsing the charge of the Mexican Lancers. In a letter addressed to his son, since the close of the civil war, General Hooker says: It was all the work of a few moments, but was long enough to satisfy me of the character of your father. It was through his agency mainly that our division was saved from a cruel slaughter, and the effect on the part of the army serving on that side of the town wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
fterward his foe and opponent on a wider arena of battle to do justice to his coolness and bravery, and the testimony is all the movie grateful because it is the tribute of one great and large-hearted soldier to another. General (then Captain) Joe Hooker, afterward distinguished as the fighting general of the Federal army in the civil war, thus describes the action of General Johnston, and his coolness and power of control in arresting the rapid withdrawal of the Ohio regiment across the cornfield, in full range of the enemy's guns, and reforming it under the chapparal wall and successfully repulsing the charge of the Mexican Lancers. In a letter addressed to his son, since the close of the civil war, General Hooker says: It was all the work of a few moments, but was long enough to satisfy me of the character of your father. It was through his agency mainly that our division was saved from a cruel slaughter, and the effect on the part of the army serving on that side of the town wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
hter. 1863—Chancellorsville. With the dawn of spring in 1863, a replenished army with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absent in Southeast Virginia. But slender as are his numbers, Lee is ever aggressive; and while Hooker with the finest army on the planet, as he styled it, is confronting Lee near Chancellorsville, and Early is holding Sedgwick at bay at Fredericksburg, Jackson, who, the long roll is beating. Less than a month has passed, and again the Army of Northern Virginia is in motion, and while Hooker is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and eor practically closed the sixth expedition aimed directly at the Confederate Capital—McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker and now Grant,—all being disastrously repulsed by the Army of Northern Virginia, and all but the first receiving their re<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
ith General Bragg in attributing the capture of Lookout Mountain by Hooker to the disobedience of orders by Longstreet. General Bragg had ordh Carolina), and consequently not only was that position carried by Hooker, but it opened the way for him to join Grant in Chattanooga. began ed. Battle of Lookout Mountain. Throwing a heavy column under Hooker to the south side of the river by means of floating pontoons, and fenty-seventh Mississippi, under the command of Colonel Campbell, Hooker's corps, which Longstreet had permitted to obtain a lodgment on Loo, was forced to yield the Mountain, falling back to the Ridge; and Hooker, on the night of the 25th of November, occupied it and placed himsetle in his front. To hold his line of railroad was all important. Hooker's force on the mountain could be distinctly seen. To oppose him aninning hand with eyes fixed steadily on his opponent, until finally Hooker moved his columns along the Rossville road towards General Bragg's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
of being captured or shot, for it is but a short distance from White Oak Swamp to the road upon which he was traveling at that time, and this was occupied by General Hooker, with his command, who could have intercepted the bold raider without the slighest difficulty had he known of his approach. At this point he had the James very near him on the south and General Hooker on the north in uncomfortable proximity. But this never delayed Stuart a minute in his important mission. He moved rapidly on, and arrived at General R. E. Lee's headquarters before sunrise the following morning. Before this he had given orders to Captain Frayser to see Governor Joh Again, when Stuart passed into the Confederate lines between White Oak Swamp and the James, McClellan could have closed the only avenue of escape by ordering General Hooker, who occupied White Oak Swamp, the extreme left wing of his army, to extend his lines to the James. This would have closed the doors upon Stuart and he and h