Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joe Hooker or search for Joe Hooker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
n differed from mine, and he believed the enemy would turn his position and cut him off. But, said he, true soldier as he was, I always obey orders, and only ask as a protection, in case of disaster, that you put the order in writing. This was done as soon as materials could be found, and the staff officer returned and reported the result of his mission. He had not reached me, however, before the attack, in front, as I expected, was made. Cleburn gallantly met it, defeated the enemy under Hooker, drove him back, and then quietly followed the army without further molestation. Mark the difference in conduct and results. A good soldier, by obedience, without substituting his own crude notions, defeats the enemy and saves an army from disaster. And mark the credit he gets for it. The Confederate Congress passed a vote of thanks to the gallant Cleburn and his command for saving Bragg's army. Not to this day has it ever been known that he did it in obedience to orders and against his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the last campaign of the army of Tennessee, from May, 1864, to January, 1865. (search)
n. We were expected to defend a front of six or seven miles, exposed for the whole distance, by the nature of the country, to surprises and snares, but particularly so upon our left. That portion of our line rested on Lookout Mountain, but was cut off from the rest by the deep ravine which separated the mountain from the ridge. It was first attacked and routed, and what few men we had there nearly all killed or captured. That deep, intervening ravine was the door through which fighting Joe Hooker entered and gained easy access to our rear, for the simple reason that there was no one for him to fight. We had not men enough to guard the point. Whilst the storming of the ridge was going on, the enemy were pouring, almost unmolested, through this road, and had not the defection of our troops taken place, we would all have been captured by night. As it was, our centre broke, almost without striking a blow. The men on the left and right were compelled to give way, and before nine o'c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer, and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnatti, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
son's Valley campaign, only nine lines to the Second Manassas campaign, twenty-two lines to the Maryland campaign, only six lines to Fredericksburg, thirty-three lines to falsifying the facts about the Emancipation Proclamation, only thirteen (really only two) lines to Chancellorsville, twenty lines to Gettysburg, thirty-two lines to the capture of Vicksburg, four lines to the splendid Confederate victory at Chickamauga, and forty-five lines to telling of Grant's masterpiece of strategy, and Hooker, Sherman and Sheridan's splendid expoits near Chattanooga. I have not space to follow out further now these illustrations of the utterly unfair tone and spirit of the book. In other papers I propose to examine in detail some of its false statements, omissions and misrepresentations, and to bring cumulative proof that the book is so utterly unfit to be used in our schools that it is a great outrage for school boards (from whatever motives) to introduce it into our schools—that teachers s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
e Ninth corps under Reno and First corps under Hooker. His centre under Sumner consisted of the Tweosition taken in the morning from Garland, but Hooker worked and fought his way to the possession of in possession of the gap and of the left, and Hooker firmly seated on the mountain on the right, whrigades of Lawton and Trimble took his place. Hooker withdrew up the Hagerstown pike and went into still and grim, under the light of the stars. Hooker's men were comfortable with supper and coffee. corps, marching into position. He crossed on Hooker's route and took place a mile in his rear. Byn the morning the two armies were astir. With Hooker there was bustle and cooking and coffee and pi darkness that precedes the dawn. By daylight Hooker got into motion, Doubleday's division on his rleft, marching over the same ground from which Hooker had just been driven. Crawford was met and chnd corps, had started at 7.20 A. M. to support Hooker. He was then east of the Antietam. His corps[7 more...]