Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joe Hooker or search for Joe Hooker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
; but the struggle there was carried on by the division of Heintzelman's corps, commanded by General Hooker, and by a brigade from Reno's division. The contest was maintained by a Federal line, of which Robinson was in command on the right, Hooker in the centre, and Milroy rampant generally on the left. These were the troops whose cheers we heard when Schurz's division fell back, and the righy noon that it took no further part in the action of the day. Gordon, page 259. We had fought Hooker's division of Heintzelman's corps, which, it appears, was five thousand five hundred The Army uivision, and not in our favor. Complimenting Schurz's division, as it was relieved at midday by Hooker, General Gordon says, page 259: From 5 o'clock in the morning his (Schurz's) division had beere relieved as having done their full share of the day's work, while we, after having withstood Hooker's division and Gower's charge, since Schurz had been relieved, were expected to be more than a m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
ve multiplied themselves astonishingly, but unfortunately for us, not in overwhelming numbers. Burnside tells us that he sent two peremptory orders to Fighting Joe Hooker before he would move forward his corps. From the foot of the mountain Fighting Joe watched the magnificent advance of the divisions of Meade and Hatch, followeceed four thousand men. I think that estimate very high. But admitting this number, and that it was equally divided on the two sides of the pike, then Fighting Joe Hooker was contending with fifteen thousand men against 3,200 men, more than half of them in a broken down condition. However, his powerful field glass gave Fighting rces of supply or recruitment held on for two years longer, defeating Pope at Cedar Mountain and Second Manassas, driving back Burnside at Fredericksburg, routing Hooker at Chancellorsville, and, finally, when reduced to fifty-nine thousand, hurling themselves with incredible valor against a newly equipped army of one hundred and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid against Richmond. (search)
g an account of the treatment received when a prisoner, says: All this brutal punishment was inflicted upon us, according to the statement of the Confederate prison officials, on account of those papers said to have been found on the body of Colonel Dahlgren at the time he was killed. But the name of Colonel Dahlgren can never be injured by any slander or forgery that can be concocted by all the enemies of our country. His deeds speak for themselves. His career with Sigel, Burnside, Hooker, Meade and Kilpatrick, together with his exploits at Fredericksburg, Beverley Ford, Chambersburg and in front of Richmond, will live when the name of the last traitor in the land is forgotten. I pronounce those papers a base forgery, and will give some of my reasons for so doing. I was with the expedition in the capacity of signal officer, and was the only staff officer with him. I had charge of all the material for destroying bridges, blowing up locks, aqueducts, etc. I knew all his pl