hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William H. Hope or search for William H. Hope in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

ate, company K, wounded. Fourth Michigan Cavalry.--Sergeant David Donahoe, company D, private John Caul, company D, private George Rise, company C, private William Heistine, company B, wounded. Ninety-eighth Illinois Mounted Infantry.--Sergeant H. O. Wilkins, company D, Sergeant B. F. Blackford, company H, private J. H. Enson, company B, private J. B. Shaw, company D, private J. M. Walker, company H, private James Stackwell, company I, private Abram Barnes, company K, wounded; private William H. Hope, company E, private A. M. Anderson, company E, missing. Total.--Two killed, nineteen wounded two missing. I had no means of ascertaining the injury done the enemy; but it was reported that eight bodies were left on the field. I took twenty-three prisoners. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Eli long, Col. Commanding Second Brigade, Second Division Cavalry. Brigadier-General Whipple, A. A. G., Department of the Cumberland. Inclosure. headquarters Second bri
Doc. 69.-attack on Newbern, N. C. General Palmer's despatch. Newbern, N. C., February 1, 8 o'clock P. M. early this morning our outposts at Bachelor's Creek were attacked by the enemy, represented to be in force about fifteen thousand strong, consisting of Hope's brigade and Pickett's entire division. It being impracticable to make adequate defence, our force fell back in good order, after destroying their camps and abandoning but few stores, with a loss of fifty to one hundred men and one section of light artillery. Our forces are now so arranged that we are confident of a successful resistance. Almost simultaneously with this attack, the enemy advanced on the south side of the Trent River, with what force it is difficult to estimate, but they were handsomely repulsed. Communication continues with More-head City, but the enemy are near the railroad, with the evident intention of cutting it. The commander at Beaufort is aware of the situation, and will use every effor