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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 64 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Hopkinson or search for Thomas Hopkinson in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
rican lawyer, both on account of his distinguished professional learning and his various attainments: to John Sergeant, a lawyer, once a candidate for the Vice-Presidency, with an acute intellect, chiefly exercised in politics and in his profession, with few resources for conversation, little general cultivation, cautious but still warm in the expression of opinions, particularly of dislikes, and among the latter is Lord Melbourne's administration; he declined the mission to England: to Judge Hopkinson, He died a few days later. Sumner wrote of him, Jan. 18, 1842: He has been summoned away. He was full of mirth, amiableness, talent, and learning. a person of cleverness and genius, prompt, simple, natural as a child, wearing a queue. Harrison is Mr. Otis's old friend, the veteran of Philadelphia society (I do not know him personally), hospitable and kind. Richard Peters has recently lost his wife; he is very fond of society, gay, pleasant, and familiar for years with our public
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
thee from my very heart for thy noble address. Its truths are none the less welcome for the beautiful drapery in which they are clothed. It will do great good. I would rather be the author of it than of all the war eloquence of Heathendom and Christendom combined. . . . I shall be in Boston at the Liberty Convention of the first of next month, and shall take some pains to procure an introduction to the author of the very best plea for peace which has ever fallen under my notice. Thomas Hopkinson, the college classmate whose name was familiar to the earlier pages of this Memoir, wrote from Lowell, Sept. 8, stating his conviction that the doctrines of the oration were not adapted to human nature; but saying: As a literary composition, I read it with unqualified satisfaction. I see the old style, the old hand and mind. But it is ripened, condensed, filled up with flowers and fruit, ripe scholarship grafted on a thoughtful mind. Many of its passages rise into eloquence of high