hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Leonard Horner or search for Leonard Horner in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
ailed, I think, to speak my mind before any of them; I hardened myself early. Hallam agreed with him, and both talked with a concentrated force that showed how deeply they felt about it. In some respects, the conversation was one of the most remarkable I have ever heard; and, as a testimony against aristocracy, on the point where aristocracy might be expected to work the most favorably, surprised me very much. Speaking of the Edinburgh Review, Mr. Smith said that it was begun by Jeffrey, Horner, and himself; that he was the first editor of it, and that they were originally unwilling to give Brougham any direct influence over it, because he was so violent and unmanageable. After he—Smith—left Edinburgh, Jeffrey became the editor; but, said Smith, I never would be a contributor on the common business footing. When I wrote an article, I used to send it to Jeffrey, and waited till it came out; immediately after which I enclosed to him a bill, in these words, or words like them: Franc
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
ld her I would come another time soon. I dined with the Lyells; nobody at table but solid, good Dr. Pertz and Mrs. Pertz, for they were all to go off—and I too—at a little after nine, the Lyells to the Queen's concert, and the rest of us to Mrs. Horner's. The dinner was pleasant, a little learned, a little gay, and altogether sensible. . . . . The party at Mrs. Homer's was just like the one you and I went to there last year. We had Gibson and Lady Bell, Edward Bunbury, Colonel Lyell, and perhaps a dozen more. . . . . Lady Bell and Mrs. Horner sent you abundance of affectionate messages. I talked a good deal with Richardson, Scott's old friend, who appears so largely and pleasantly in the Life by Lockhart. . . . . Telling him how fine I thought Scott's colloquial powers, he answered, Yes, but they were never so fine as when he was having a jolly good time with two or three friends. He then described to me what he considered the finest specimen he had ever had of them. It wa
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
aged; forty years ago I think they would have been interrupted by rude noises and in other ways, so that they could not have been carried on. Now they are listened to like any other grave discussions . . . . Remember us all most affectionately to Mr. and Mrs. Horner and all their house, and believe us very affectionately yours. I sign for all. Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, April 24, 1858. We have taken a very nice furnished house, five miles out of town, and shall go thereMrs. Horner and all their house, and believe us very affectionately yours. I sign for all. Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, April 24, 1858. We have taken a very nice furnished house, five miles out of town, and shall go there next month, taking with us the Dexters and the grand-daughter. I would never go away from my town-house except for mere change; so pure is the air here, the Common so bright, and the house itself so much better and more comfortable—library and all-than anything I get elsewhere. But when I do leave my city appliances, I like to go to a new place every year, or nearly every year, so as to make a real change, and not go over the old drives annually. You governors have this changing life in per
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
I kept saying to myself, He ought to have been a judge, he ought to have been Lord Chancellor. Nothing in the way of investigation seems ever to escape him, and when all his facts are brought together, then comes in his judicial fairness, and makes everything clear, as measured by some recognized principle. See what he says about Lord Shelburne's career, and especially what he says about Fox's mistake in joining Lord North. I do not know anything like it in political history. Romilly and Horner had a good deal of the same character; but, though they came to as fair and honest results as anybody, they were both practising lawyers, and preserved something of the air of advocates, in the form and turn of their discussions. Perhaps Lewis might have had the same air if he had been in the courts, and had had clients to conciliate as well as to serve. As it is, we get, I think, in him only a sort of clear, judicial statesmanship, of which—very likely because I know so little of politica
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
52, 259, 326, 71, 384, 489, 463. Holland, Queen of, II. 371, 381. Hollond, Mr., II. 479. Holmes, Dr. O. W., II. 310. Hopkinson, Francis, I. 15. Hopkinson, Judge, I. 15. Hopkinson, Mrs., I. 16. Horner, Francis, II. 150, 468. Horner, Leonard, II. 332, 358, 409. Horner, Mrs. L., II. 332, 358, 359, 360, 409. Hosmer, Miss Harriet G., II. 371, 383, 384. House of Commons, G. T. called before Committee of, I. 415; debate in, 416; debate in, II. 378. House of Lords, debate Horner, Mrs. L., II. 332, 358, 359, 360, 409. Hosmer, Miss Harriet G., II. 371, 383, 384. House of Commons, G. T. called before Committee of, I. 415; debate in, 416; debate in, II. 378. House of Lords, debate in, II. 365. Houston, General S. . I. 372, 373, 374. Huber, Francois, I. 156, 157, II. 37. Huber, V. A., II. 260. Hubner, Julius, II. 329. Hudson River, visits, I. 386, II. 282. Hugel, Baron von, II. 111, 112. Hulsemann, Chevalier, II. 263. Humboldt, Baron Alexander von, I. 128, 129, 130, 134 and note, 135, 138, 145, 146, 254, 225. 257, 258 note, 263, . 498. 499, 500, 501 II 3, 4, 20 note, 260, 315, 330 and note, 332, 333, 339, 340, 341; letter from, 411; letter to, 414.