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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 2 2 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ving had their horses killed and two being shot out of the saddle when transmitting orders. The conduct of officers and men was in every way commendable. Captains Lundy and Henry Egbert--Lieutenant Owen wounded near the enemy's guns-Lieutenants Horton, Moore, and Schnitzer, all had horses killed under them. Capt. D. J. Crocker and Lieutenant Moore, of Company K; Captain McConnell and Lieutenant Foster, of Com pany M; Captain Kendrick, of Company E; Captain Eaton and Lieutenant Belden, ode through the hottest fire, and were rallied by Major Hepburn on the right, when retiring in fine style, and formed in good order in the rear of swamp to wait orders. Major Coon, Capt. H. Egbert, Capt. William Lundy, Lieutenant Owen, and Lieutenant Horton, of the Second Battalion, led the charge on the right in the finest manner, riding boldly in advance of their commands. The daring of Lieutenant Queal, commanding Company B, was conspicuous, cheering his men to the very muzzles of the enem
e on the table; which was negatived: Yeas 66; Nays 81. Mr. Lovejoy's resolve was then adopted: Yeas 92; Nays 55; [the Yeas all Republicans; Nays, all the Democrat and Border-State conservatives, with Messrs. Sheffield, of R. I., Fenton, of N. Y., Horton, of Ohio, Wm. Kellogg, of Ill., Nixon, of N. J., and Woodruff, of Conn.] On the 10th, Mr. Clark, of N. H., proposed, and on the 11th the Senate adopted, the following: Whereas, a conspiracy has been formed against the peace, union, and l. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunlap, Dunn, English, Fouke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, We
May 26. in an able speech for the bills; and the confiscation bill was passed — Yeas 82; Nays 63. The Emancipation bill was next taken up; when, after rejecting several amendments, the vote was taken on its passage, and it was defeated: Yeas 74 (all Republicans); Nays 78--fifteen members elected as Republicans voting Nay, with all the Democrats and all the Border-State men. The Republicans voting Nay were Messrs. Dawes and Delano, of Mass., Diven, of N. Y., Dunn, of Ind., Fisher, of Del., Horton, of Ohio, Wm. Kellogg, of Ill., Killinger, of Pa., Mitchell, of Ind., Nixon, of N. J., Norton, of Ill., Porter, of Ind., A. H. Rice, of Mass., Stratton, of N. J., and Train, of Mass. Mr. Porter, of Ind., now moved May 27. a reconsideration; which narrowly escaped defeat, on a motion by Mr. Holman that it do lie on the table: Yeas 69; Nays 73. The reconsideration prevailed: Yeas 84; Nays 64: and the bill was recommitted, with instructions to report a substitute already proposed by Mr.
ssell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds, of the marines, Assistant-Surgeon Kennedy, Assistant-Engineer White, Gunner Horton, and Midshipmen Forrest and Higginson. The whole force detailed consisted of about one hundred men, officers, sailors, and marines. The object of the expeditom her moorings, and has drifted down opposite Fort Barrancas, where she sunk. Of the party assigned to the spiking of the gun, only Lieutenant Sproston and gunner Horton were able, after considerable search, to find it, the party becoming separated in the darkness. No opposition was made to their landing; Midshipman Steece, wible service. Very fortunately, only one man was found in charge of the gun, and he immediately levelled his piece at Lieutenant Sproston, but was shot down by gunner Horton before he could obtain certain aim. Both pieces exploded simultaneously. The gun, which was found to be a ten-inch columbiad, was immediately spiked, and, bri
een dead on the field. Their loss must have been near one hundred. After being repulsed, the enemy fled, hotly pursued by our regiment, and reached the Coldwater at night, where they had reinforcements and artillery posted on the opposite side. Colonel Hepburn formed line and attacked, and had quite a brisk engagement — firing only by the flashes from the enemy's guns. It being night, and the rebels with reinforcements, our troops fell back, and rested for the night. At this place Captain Horton, of company A, was wounded in the spine. He was brought to the city to-day. The rebels were armed with Austrian muskets. I saw two bullets extracted from the wounded, and they are large and effective. I omitted to state that Orderly-Sergeant Daniel Estell, of Company L, was missing at the engagement at Collierville, and not yet heard from. Colonel Hatch left Collierville, early this morning, with other forces of his command, and will pursue the enemy vigorously. The Colonel h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Garland's report of the battle of seven Pines. (search)
s Howard and Cross; Private Burleson. Company F--Captain Pooser (killed); Privates Irvin (killed), Tillinghast, Pooser and Butler. Company G--Captain Flagg (killed); Lieutenants Brown and Wright, and Seargeant Roberts--wounded; Private Masters. Company H--Lieutenant Carlisle; Privates Papy (killed), Halman (wounded), A. Dupont and Crabtree. Company I--Corporal Belate (wounded). Company K--Captain Butler (killed). Company L--Captain Perry (killed); Privates Herndon, Dampier, Horton and Wilder. Fifth North Carolina. Lieutenant J. M. Taylor, Assistant Adjutant-General; Lieutenant J. A. Jones. Company E--Sergeant J. M. Miller, Color-Bearer; Corporals L-Bain and Benjamin Rollins. Company H--Sergeant James Goodman (for gallantry here and Williamsburg). Second Mississippi battalion. Company A--Private Sutton; Company B--Private Willis; Company C--Private Williams; Company G--Sergeant Weeks; Company H--Private Hankinson. The field officers of the Twenty-four
,437T. BaileyJune 14, 1859. 26,504R. S. LawrenceDec. 20, 1859. *26,734T. P. GouldJan. 3, 1860. *28,646N. W. BrewerJune 12, 1860. 30,033E. AllenSept 18, 1860. *30,760J. S. ReederNov. 27, 1861. 33,607C. SharpsOct. 29, 1861. 33,769A. HamiltonNov. 19, 1861. 34,325G. W. WhiteFeb. 4, 1862. *34,504E. M. JuddFeb. 25, 1862. 35,686F. DewzlerApr. 29, 1862. 37,339G. W. WhiteJan. 6, 1863. 37,544J. DavisJan. 27, 1863. 33,455W. AldrichMay 12, 1863 *33,004W. H. RiceMay 19, 1863. 41,343Mix and HortonJan. 9, 1864. *41,375J. GrayJan. 26, 1864. 42,139C. B. HoldenMar. 29, 1864. 42,685C. F. PayneMay 10, 1864. 42,743L. N. ChapinMay 17, 1864. *44,995J. GrayNov. 8, 1864. *45,105R. WilsonNov. 15, 1864. *45,560J. GrayDec. 20, 1864. *45,919W. FitzgeraldJan. 17, 1865. 49,583L. W. BroadwellAug. 22, 1865. 51,243W. TibbalsNov. 28, 1865. 51,258J. DavisNov. 28, 1865. 54,744J. LeeMay 15, 1866. 54,934J. V. McigsMay 22, 1866. 59,549J. N. AronsonNov. 13, 1866. 62,077C. SharpsFeb. 12, 1867. 64
am Lee on account of the value of his invention; as it would interfere with the employment of a great number of her subjects, and to make the stockings for a whole people was too large a grant for any individual. About the same style of remark as was urged by Jefferson against one of Oliver Evans's patents, the hopper-boy, so called. Cottom stockings were first made by hand about 1730. The Derby ribbed stockings were patented by Jeremiah Strutt, in 1759. The knotter frame patented by Horton, 1776. Of a Chinese village called the old Duck, the Abbe Hue writes: What struck us most in this place was that the art of knitting, which we had imagined unknown in China, was here carried on very busily; and, moreover, not by women, but by men. Their work appeared to be very clumsy; the stockings they made were like sacks; and their gloves had no separation for the fingers. It looked very odd, too, to see moustachioed fellows sitting before their doors spinning, knitting, and gossiping
1,021.Jordan, Mar. 22, 1870. 19,971.Wheeler, April 13, 1858.115,110.Scow, May 23, 1871. 26,268.Horton, Nov. 9, 1859.138,378.Clark, April 29, 1873. 28,470.Grant, May 29, 1860. b. Finely shredded, at Pawtucket, R I1789 Hammond's application of the stocking-frame to the weaving of lace1768 Horton's knotted-frame1776 James Hargreaves, one of the martyrs of scientific industry, invented th See patents, Gleason, October 9, 1841. No. 19,971. Wheeler, April 13, 1858. No. 26,268. Horton, November 29, 1859. No. 101,021. Jordan, March 22, 1870. No. 115,110. Scow, May 23, 1871chimney. In Fig. 5628, A is a front elevation, B a transverse and C a longitudinal section of Horton's boiler. Horton's boiler: a is a front elevation, B a transverse and C a longitudinal sectioHorton's boiler: a is a front elevation, B a transverse and C a longitudinal section. The upper and lower parts a b are cylindrical and connected by a space c with vertical sides, through which the transverse flues d d pass. The fire spaces are in the lower flues e e, and the heate
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
boat off, Cushing, after refusing to surrender, ordered the crew to save themselves, and taking off his coat and shoes, jumped into the river. Others followed his example; but all returned except three, Woodman, and two of the crew, Higgins and Horton. Horton made his escape, but the other two were drowned. Gushing swam to the middle of the stream. Half a mile below he met Woodman in the water, completely exhausted. Gushing helped him to go on for a little distance, but he was by this timeHorton made his escape, but the other two were drowned. Gushing swam to the middle of the stream. Half a mile below he met Woodman in the water, completely exhausted. Gushing helped him to go on for a little distance, but he was by this time too weak to get his companion ashore. Reaching the bank with difficulty, he waited till daylight, when he crawled cut of the water and stole into the swamp, not far from the fort. On his way he fell in with a negro, whom he sent to gain information as to the result of the night's work. As soon as he learned that the Albemarle was sunk, he moved on until he came to a creek, where he captured a skiff, and in this he made his way the next night to the picket-boat at the mouth of the river. T
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