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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 2 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 2 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 2 0 Browse Search
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seat, under lock and key, the following articles:-- Three bed-sacks, six 2-pound cans beef-stock, one leather bucket, three camp kettles (assorted sizes), one lantern and candle, six tin plates, six table-spoons, six tin tumblers; and, just before a battle, ten pounds hard bread were required to be put into the box. There was another scheme, which was conceived and carried into execution by Dr. Letterman, which deserves mention in this connection. This was the establishment of Field Hospitals, in order that the wounded might receive the most prompt and efficient attention during and after an engagement, and that the necessary operations might be performed by the most skilful and responsible surgeons, at the earliest moment. Under Surgeon Tripler, there had been rendezvous established in rear of the army, to which all the wounded were taken for immediate attention, before A four-wheeled ambulance. being sent to general hospitals. But there was no recognized system and eff
of highest rank killed on our side, was Lieut.-Colonel Samuel McFarland, Nineteenth Iowa infantry, while gallantly leading his regiment. The smoke of the battle having cleared away, and it having been ascertained that the enemy had not stopped in his retreat until he reached Van Buren, our next care was to bury our dead and look after our wounded. The enemy also, under a flag of truce, had men and surgeons on the field gathering up their dead and wounded. I visited a number of our Field Hospitals, and it was the most affecting sight I ever saw to see so many of our poor fellows breathing out their noble lives. A young man to my left, as I passed through a ward in which most of the patients were regarded as mortally wounded, knowing that dissolution was near, was dictating a last message to his young wife; and another to my right was directing a comrade by his side to send some loving word to his mother; and near by another, whose countenance showed that life was fast ebbing awa
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
000 more lost in the various operations around Petersburg up to March 28, 1865, and counting the missing at the moderate number of 10,000 for this period, we have the aggregate of 75,000 men cut down in the Army of the Potomac to mark the character of the service and the cost of the campaign thus far. If any minds demanding exactitude are troubled at the slight discrepancies in these reports, they may find relief in a passage in the Report of Surgeon Dalton, Chief Medical Officer of Field Hospitals for this campaign. He says of his experience with the treatment of disabled men in the field: It is impossible to convey an accurate idea of the number of sick and wounded who have received attention in this hospital,--that following the army. Hundreds passed through under circumstances which rendered it impossible to register their names or even accurately estimate their numbers. So unremitting were the calls for professional duty during the first fortnight that it was impossi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
gold, Ga., Jan. 15, ‘63, Rome, Ga., Jan. 31, ‘63, on leave 'til May 20, ‘63. Sept. 21, ‘63, reported to Medical-Director on battle-field. Placed on duty with Field Hospitals at Snodgrass and Cloudes, Sept. 30, ‘63, Medical-Directors office, Feb. 12, ‘64, Headquarters A. T., Dalton, Ga., March 21, ‘64, ordered to report to General alry. Price, Louis T., Surgeon, com'd Oct. 28, ‘61. Dec. 31st Post Surgeon, Rome, Ga., March 21, ‘63, appointed President A. B. M. E., April 23, ‘63, Medical-Director Hospitals Gen. Bragg's Army. May 29, ‘63, Inspector Hospitals Gen. Bragg's Army. Phillips, N. D., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Aug. 21, ‘6Inspector Hospitals Gen. Bragg's Army. Phillips, N. D., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War Aug. 21, ‘62, to rank from Aug. 20, ‘62, reported to Capt Smith. Passed Board at Chattanooga Aug. 20, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Smith's Battery, trans. with Bat. to Army by order Gen. Polk. Oct. 31, ‘63, Smith's Battery, Nov. 30, ‘63, Turner's Battery. April 30, ‘64, Hoxton's Battalion. Phillips, M. N., Assista
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hospitals and Medical officers in charge, attached to the Army of Tennessee, July, 1864. (search)
General Hospitals and Medical officers in charge, attached to the Army of Tennessee, July, 1864. During my inspection of the Field and General Hospitals of the Army of Tennessee in July, August and September, 1864, I examined the records of the following: Zzzatlanta, Georgia. Medical College Hospital, Surgeon W. F. Westmoreland. Fair Ground Hospital, No. 1, Surgeons R. C. Divine and H. W. Broun. Fair Ground Hospital, No. 2, Surgeon George G. Crawford. Polk Hospital, Surgeon General Hospitals of the Army of Tennessee in July, August and September, 1864, I examined the records of the following: Zzzatlanta, Georgia. Medical College Hospital, Surgeon W. F. Westmoreland. Fair Ground Hospital, No. 1, Surgeons R. C. Divine and H. W. Broun. Fair Ground Hospital, No. 2, Surgeon George G. Crawford. Polk Hospital, Surgeon Robert Battey. Gate City Hospital, Surgeon Paul F. Eve. Institute Hospital, Surgeon D. C. O'Keefe. Prison Hospital for Federals, Sr. Surgeon G. G. Roy. Roy Hospital, Assistant Surgeon G. G. Roy. Roy Hospital, Surgeon D. C. O'Keefe. Roy Hospital, Surgeon William Welsh. Roy Hospital, Surgeon Paul F. Eve. Receiving and Distributing Hospital, Assistant Surgeon Meeking, and Surgeon G. T. Pursley. General Hospital, Surgeon J. P. Logan. Empire Hospital, Surgeon Wm. P. Harden. Winship a