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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Hotchkiss or search for Hotchkiss in all documents.

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t, one hundred and twenty percussion primers, nine nine-inch solid shot, thirty Enfield refle-ball cartridges, five one hundred and fifty pounder Parrott's solid shot, (long,) seventy revolver percussion-caps, thirty-seven eleven-inch shell, filled and fuzed five seconds; twenty friction primers, twenty-three nine-inch shell, filled and fuzed five seconds; sixty pistol-ball cartridges, seven one hundred and fifty pounder Parrott shell, filled and fuzed, five seconds; thirteen fifty-pounder Hotchkiss shell, filled and fuzed, five seconds; two cutlasses, (Ames,) two hundred musket percussion-caps, three cutlass scabbards, seven Parrott rings, for time fuzes; seven metal time fuzes, five seconds; six eleven-inch selvagee wads, eight nine-inch selvagee wads, two nine-inch passing-boxes. Very respectfully, your obedient servants. S. A. Mccarty, Lieutenant United States Navy. G. H. Wadleigh, Ensign. John G. Foster, Gunner, United States Navy. Captain J. B. Marchand, Commanding U. S. S
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-reconnoissance to Dalton, Ga. (search)
eral Crufts's men, and, climbing Tunnel Hill Ridge, where it is quite low, and there was no force of the enemy to oppose, to move along the summit, until he could assail the rebel works upon their right flank. In the mean time, two pieces of Hotchkiss's battery opened upon the rebel battery from the hill upon the right of the road. An animated duel continued for some time. The rebels threw missiles with much precision. Captain Hotchkiss planted his shells where they would have been very eCaptain Hotchkiss planted his shells where they would have been very effective, had they not for some unknown reason mostly failed to explode. Captain Harris moved two guns of his battery (Nineteenth Indiana) over into the fields upon the left, and fired a few effective shots. Between the two, the rebel battery had too much of it, and withdrew at about half-past 3 P. M., just as General Morgan's men were seen marching along the summit of the ridge, toward the rebel works. Seeing themselves thus outflanked by General Morgan upon their right, and seriously t