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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jedediah Hotchkiss or search for Jedediah Hotchkiss in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
made us cower in the smallest possible space, and wish we had each a little red cap in the fairy tale, which, by putting on our heads, would make us invisible. But what is that infernal noise that makes the bravest duck their heads? That is a Hotchkiss shell. Thank goodness, it bursted far in the rear. It is no more destructive than some other projectile, but there is a great deal in mere sound to work on men's fears, and the moral effect of the Hotchkiss is powerful. The tremendous screenteenth lay, prone on their faces, and literally tore poor Appich, of Company E, to pieces, shattering his body terribly, and causing the blood to spatter over many who lay around him. A quiver of the form, and then it remained still. Another Hotchkiss came screeching where we lay, and exploded, two more men were borne to the rear; still the line never moved nor uttered a sound. The shells split all around, and knocked up the dust until it sprinkled us so, that if it intended to keep the thi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
made us cower in the smallest possible space, and wish we had each a little red cap in the fairy tale, which, by putting on our heads, would make us invisible. But what is that infernal noise that makes the bravest duck their heads? That is a Hotchkiss shell. Thank goodness, it bursted far in the rear. It is no more destructive than some other projectile, but there is a great deal in mere sound to work on men's fears, and the moral effect of the Hotchkiss is powerful. The tremendous screenteenth lay, prone on their faces, and literally tore poor Appich, of Company E, to pieces, shattering his body terribly, and causing the blood to spatter over many who lay around him. A quiver of the form, and then it remained still. Another Hotchkiss came screeching where we lay, and exploded, two more men were borne to the rear; still the line never moved nor uttered a sound. The shells split all around, and knocked up the dust until it sprinkled us so, that if it intended to keep the thi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Allan's history of the Valley campaign. (search)
n. ByMajor F. Scheibert. The readers of the Southern Historical Society Papers may be surprised that a Prussian should venture to give a notice of an American book. But I regard this work of Colonel Allan's, and the beautiful maps of Major Hotchkiss which it contains, as worthy of being held up as a model for military study. The original development of the designs of Jackson—the many interesting details of his movements—the clearness with which the marches, manoeuvres and battles areilitary situation, and the vivid description of the state of political affairs in Washington and abroad—the settling of the numerical strength on both sides—and last, but never least, nay first for the foreign reader, the excellent maps of Major Jed. Hotchkiss (which, by the way, he showed me and I greatly admired during the Gettysburg campaign of 1863,)—all combine to make Colonel Allan's book a military classic. I had already translated into German Colonel Allan's address before the Army