hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Houston or search for Houston in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

cool, steady bearing in the fight, but also for the efficient training of the crew, which have been together now less than three months, but displayed in the action the steadiness of veterans, fighting their guns almost as coolly as if they were at an ordinary exercise. Lieutenant Thomas L. Swann, the ordnance officer, had every thing ready, and the working of his department was admirable; he was principally occupied during the action with the bow-chasers. The other division officers-Captain Houston, of the marines, Lieutenant Charles F. Blake, Ensigns Cassel and Sigsbee, with their assistants, Master's Mates Duncan and Stevens — fought their guns nobly and well. The powder division, under Acting Ensign Utter, could not have been conducted better. Chief-Engineer Kellogg's department worked beautifully. Doctor Maulsby was fully prepared for the wounded, and extended to these unfortunates all the solicitude and care that a generous nature could dictate. Ensign Pendleton,