hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 10 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Houston or search for Houston in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 1: Louisiana. (search)
heart, and got Republicans in Washington to mark him as a man to carry out their plans. Kellogg was intriguing for the State senator's chair, when the more lucrative and dazzling prize of Governor swung before his eyes. The place is worth eight thousand dollars a year in gold. Except the Governor of Pennsylvania, who receives ten thousand dollars a year, the Governor of Louisiana has the highest pay of any governor in the United States. Governor Coke of Texas has only five thousand, Governor Houston of Alabama only four thousand-Governor Ames of Mississippi only three thousand dollars a year. Besides his eight thousand a year, a Governor of Louisiana has perquisites and patronage worth more than double his official salary. If he wishes to make money fast, and feels no scruple as to means, the wealth of New Orleans, the commerce of the Gulf, are in his hands. Governor Warmoth is said to have found a fortune at the State House. The highest prizes offered to ambition by the Stat
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 6: invasion! (search)
otes. Neither party has a legal quorum; and the Republicans, finding they have lost their small majority, begin to slip away from their seats. But the Conservatives, accustomed to such dodges, intercept them before a count-out can be tried. A member proposes the Hon. Louis A. Wiltz as Speaker; a second member proposes the Hon. Michael Hahn. Fifty-eight members are present in the House. Fifty-five cast their votes for Wiltz, who is declared elected, in the midst of frantic cheers. Judge Houston, who is standing by his chair, administers the usual oath of loyalty to tile law and constitution of Louisiana. Wiltz calls the House, and swears the members who remain. Though some have slipped away there is a legal quorum. Hahn, uncertain what to do, remains, and takes the oath from Wiltz. Captain Floyd is voted Serjeant, and Mr. Trezevant nominated Clerk. The House is now composed. Wiltz, as Speaker, invites General De Trobriand to remove the police, who occupy doors and passage