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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 153 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 81 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 59 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sam Houston or search for Sam Houston in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
sting than bronze— more enduring than marble or granite. Our trip over the Crescent route to Houston, and thence down to Galveston, was a most pleasant one, and we found, on arriving at the elightful recollections of Galveston, as we returned to meet an engagement for that night in Houston. Here the committees of the Cotton Exchange, of the citizens generally, and of the survivors it again at our earliest opportunity. The General was escorted to Gray's Opera-House by the Houston Light Guard and the committees, and was greeted there by a large and enthusiastic audience. Am in the regular army, and assigned him to the post of Adjutant-General of the republic. President Sam Houston about the same time sent him a commission as aid-de-camp, with the rank of Major. He at Proceeding to New Orleans, in the interest of the Texan government, he was notified by President Sam Houston that he was placed in nomination as Brigadier-General of the army, and he proceeded to T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
future generations say of them, They have erected monuments more lasting than bronze— more enduring than marble or granite. Our trip over the Crescent route to Houston, and thence down to Galveston, was a most pleasant one, and we found, on arriving at the latter city, that Captain A. M. Stafford, of the Galveston Artillerd flow of soul We bore away with us the next morning the most delightful recollections of Galveston, as we returned to meet an engagement for that night in Houston. Here the committees of the Cotton Exchange, of the citizens generally, and of the survivors of the Army of Northern Virginia, and of Hood's old brigade, met ung, busy, progressive city, but we saw enough to determine to visit it again at our earliest opportunity. The General was escorted to Gray's Opera-House by the Houston Light Guard and the committees, and was greeted there by a large and enthusiastic audience. Among the flags which decorated the stage was the old battle flag of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
me day (fifth of August) on which General Rusk appointed him Adjutant of the army, with the rank of Colonel, President Burnett appointed him a Colonel in the regular army, and assigned him to the post of Adjutant-General of the republic. President Sam Houston about the same time sent him a commission as aid-de-camp, with the rank of Major. He at once entered on the-task of organizing and disciplining the army. This was partially accomplished, when, on the 17th of September, 1836, he was summoned by the Hon. John A. Wharton, then Secretary of War, to the capital, to discharge the duties of his office there. Proceeding to New Orleans, in the interest of the Texan government, he was notified by President Sam Houston that he was placed in nomination as Brigadier-General of the army, and he proceeded to Texas and took command of her army. When General Johnston assumed command of the army, a hostile meeting was forced upon him by his second in command, General Felix Houston, who cl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
intendent of the Ohio and Mississippi, and renewed obligations to Colonel Hoxie, of the Missouri Pacific, and all the lines of the great Goul system; M. H. Smith, Vice President of the splendid Louisville and Nashville railway; and Henry Fink, Vice President and General Manager of the superb line from Memphis to Norfolk, for highly appreciated courtesies over their lines. And we desire gratefully to record that in travelling in February and March, from Richmond to New Orleans, Galveston, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Waco, Corsicana, Dallas, Little Rock, Memphis, Nashville, Louisville and back to Richmond by the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad, and recently to Louisville, St. Louis, Waco, Dallas, Memphis and back home by the Memphis and Charleston, East Tennessee and Georgia, Norfolk and Western, and Richmond and Danville railroads, we met with no accident, suffered no serious detention, encountered nothing but politeness on the part of railroad officials, and had all of the comforts