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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 117 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 30 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for A. P. Hovey or search for A. P. Hovey in all documents.

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ly Springs about two weeks later, repairing the railroad as he marched, and established his depot of supplies at the point he had now reached. About the same time Van Dorn's rear was threatened by a Federal expedition from Arkansas, under Gen. A. P. Hovey, consisting of 5,000 infantry and 2,000 cavalry, which landed at Delta and Friar's Point and moved toward Charleston. Pemberton again called for reinforcements, and suggested that Bragg in Tennessee move against Grant's communications, and e head of your army; tell your own people that you have come to share with them the perils of this dark hour, implored this anxious Mississippian. Pemberton reported on December 5th the advance of Grant on the Central railroad, the movement of Hovey and starting of Sherman down the Mississippi, adding that at the same time a demonstration was made from below on Port Hudson, La., within his department. He stated that Port Hudson was now held by about 5,500 men strongly intrenched; that Vick
enter and manufacturing city, hurried McClernand and McPherson toward Bolton. On the night of the 15th, when Pemberton's army was in bivouac beyond Baker's creek, Hovey's division was on his flank at Bolton, with Carr and Osterhaus and the advance of McPherson's corps near at hand, while Smith and Blair were not far from Loring onat, provided the Confederate strength had been put on the battlefield, which was where Stevenson was. The Federal forces opposed to Stevenson were the divisions of Hovey, Logan and Crocker, and their strength, according to Grant, was 15,000 men. Stevenson confronted them until 2 o'clock, with no serious discomfiture, with 6,500. Onded, 42 missing; Buford's brigade lost 11 killed and 49 wounded; Featherston's brigade 2 wounded and 1 captured. On the Federal side the main loss was sustained by Hovey's division, which lost a third of its numbers. The total Federal loss was 410 killed, 1,844 wounded, 187 missing. Pemberton said: Had the movement in support o
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
He was a farmer from 1866 to 1877. In the latter year he was elected superintendent of public education of the State. Brigadier-General Peter B. Starke, a distinguished cavalry commander, became colonel of the Twenty-eighth Mississippi cavalry regiment by commission dated February 24, 1862. His regiment was attached to the command of Gen. M. L. Smith, for the defense of Vicksburg, and in September was nearly 700 strong. Stationed at Panola in November, he gave notice of the advance of Hovey's expedition from Arkansas, and during that fruitless movement by the enemy his regiment was engaged in various skirmishes. From this time during the long-continued efforts for the reduction of Vicksburg the Confederate cavalry was busily engaged in watching the movements of the enemy. At the organization of forces outside Vicksburg by General Johnston he and his regiment were assigned to the cavalry brigade of Gen. W. H. Jackson, first composed of the regiments of Pinson, Harris, Starke,