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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 95 5 Browse Search
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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 7: at West Point as instructor, 1857-61; the outbreak of the Civil War (search)
the youthful Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives. It read: Will you, if elected, accept the colonelcy of the Kennebec Regiment Over this dispatch Mrs. Howard and I had a conference. We thought it would be wiser to begin with a major's commission, so that I might be better prepared for a colonelcy when I came to it bed, what is the matter Oh, I've had the tender, or what amounts to it, of a Maine regiment. What answer would you give, colonel You'll accept, of course, Howard. He then took up the army regulations and turned to the duties of regimental officers, folding down the leaves, and kindly explained a few things that a colonel should know. Surely, Howard, you know the drill and parades, and it will not take you long to get well into the harness. Thus encouraged I telegraphed an affirmative answer. The news of my probable election and the rapid call for troops from Washington, as published in the press, decided me to anticipate official notific
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 8: Colonel of the Third Maine regiment; departure for the front (search)
n & Maine, and sped off to arrive at Augusta before five the same afternoon. Here I received Mr. Blaine's reply as follows: Augusta, 29th of May, 1861. My Dear Howard: You were chosen to the command of the Third Regiment yesterday and public opinion is entirely unanimous in favor of having you accept the position. You will nt, with a balcony above it. I found the porch and balcony very convenient for meeting the officers and friends of the regiment. At this hotel my brother, Charles Henry Howard, a Bangor theological student, met me, shortly after my arrival, to offer himself for enlistment. Israel Washburn was Governor of Maine. He had a largent as an agent of the Christian Commission. My disappointment was lessened by my younger brother's enlistment and detail as regimental clerk. This brother, Charles H. Howard, obtained his first commission as second lieutenant in the Sixty-first New York, was with me on staff duty till 1865, and received deserved promotion from gr
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 10: camping in Washington; in command of a brigade (search)
ement the night of taking the oath; fifty or sixty men refused at first, but after a few words of explanation they rallied under the colors at the command of Colonel Howard. That June 29th I was made to sympathize with the poor fellows upon whom a radical change of life had brought illness. Suddenly, without previous symptom in reports and dispatches only later. Before leaving Augusta Mr. Blaine and I were talking of the army to be organized from the volunteers. I-e remarked: You, Howard, will be the first brigadier from Maine. Of course the proposition to me, accustomed only to wrinkled captains and white-headed field officers, appeared visionarst after the accession of my brigade to his division is a specimen of the prevailing restriction: Headquarters Third Division, Alexandria, July 10, 1861. Colonel Howard, Commanding Third Brigade. Sir: The bearer of this note, R. F. Roberts, states that privates of the Fourth and Fifth Maine regiments have been committing d
to flight. Curiously enough, instead of taking a short road to Centreville, the unreasoning multitude went back the long sevenmile route, exposing themselves every moment to death or capture. After the complete break-up, just before the recrossing of Bull Run, Heintzelman, with his wounded arm in a sling, rode up and down and made a last effort to restore order. He sharply reprimanded every officer he encountered. He swore at me. From time to time I renewed my attempts. My brother, C. H. Howard, if he saw me relax for a moment, sang out: Oh, do try again! Part of the Fourteenth New York from Brooklyn rallied north of Bull Run and were moving on in fine shape. See them, said my brother; let us try to form like that So we were trying, gathering a few, but in vain. One foolish cry behind a team of horses thundering along the road was: The black horse cavalry are upon us! This sent the Brooklyn men and all others in disorder into the neighboring woods. Then I stopped all effor
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
everal engagements went again and again to death's door but lived through a most distinguished career of work and promotion to exercise eminent civil functions after the war, and Miller, who fell in our first great battle. My brother, Lieutenant C. H. Howard, and Lieutenant Nelson A. Miles were then my aids. Sumner, noticing his conduct in action, used to say of Miles: That officer will get promoted or get killed. F. D. Sewall, for many months my industrious adjutant general, took the coloock Bridge, I went into camp with great care, facing different ways upon the top of a thickly wooded height. I was told that the venturesome Stuart during the night came over the river and made a personal examination, and that he afterwards said Howard had taken such a position and so posted his troops that he decided not to attack him. On my return Sumner met me with the gladness of a father. As the Maryland political campaign had gained me General Casey's confidence, so this reconnoissance
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 15: the battle of Williamsburg (search)
deep, the dirt being thrown toward the enemy. All along the parallel were openings in the embankment for batteries of siege guns. This trench was parallel to the enemy's works and 1,500 yards from them. Accompanied by my brother and aid, Lieutenant Howard, I continued back of the parallel eastward as far as the York River, and we took a good look at the waiting gunboats, some of which had come up the river to cooperate in the siege. We looked at each other and inquired: How soon shall we doand Abednego passing through the fiery furnace unscathed. Then followed, from one of the officers present, an earnest petition to the Lord of Hosts for protection, guidance, and blessing. As soon as breakfast was over I commenced a letter to Mrs. Howard, and, writing rapidly, had finished about two pages, when suddenly, without completing the sentence, I jotted down: Yorktown is abandoned and our troops are marching in. I added a little later: I am now, quarter before eight A. M., under marc
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 16: the battle of Fair Oaks (search)
down Every man dropped to the ground; then my staff and the field officers aided me in sheltering the men by forming line behind the railroad embankment, but we could not fire yet without the danger of pouring shot into French's line. In five minutes I had mounted my large gray horse, my brother riding my third and only other one, a beautiful zebra. In order to encourage the men in a forward movement I placed myself, mounted, in front of the Sixty-fourth New York, and my aid, Lieutenant Charles H. Howard, in front of the Sixty-first. Every officer was directed to repeat each command. I ordered: Forward! and then March! I could hear the echo of these words and, as I started, the Sixty-fourth followed me with a glad shout up the slope and through the woods; the Sixty-first followed my brother at the same time. We moved forward finely, taking many prisoners as we went and gaining ground leftward, until we came abreast of French's division. Before reaching French's line I was
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 19: the battle of Antietam; I succeed Sedgwick in command of a division (search)
y flank by changing the front of my brigade to the left. Those nearer to the general than I were confident that he said: Howard, you must get out of here, or Howard, you must face about! With troops that I had commanded longer I could have changeHoward, you must face about! With troops that I had commanded longer I could have changed front, whatever Sumner said; but here, quicker than I can write the words, my men faced about and took the back track. Dana's line soon followed mine and then Gorman's. When we reached the open ground Sumner himself and every other officer of courlace of F. D. Sewall, then colonel of the Nineteenth Maine, as adjutant general of the brigade. He and my brother, Lieutenant Howard, badly wounded at Fair Oaks, had rejoined after the command left Washington. It was the first time I had seen Whit countenance, but an equally strong will, Whittlesey was to me from that time the kind of help I needed in battle. Lieutenant Howard also, if he detected the least lack of coolness in me, would say quietly: Aren't you a little excited? This was en
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 21: battle of Fredericksburg (search)
M., I wrote a home letter for my children that is preserved: We are now in a house abandoned by Mr. Knox, and near the front line. One or two shells have passed clear through the house, but my room is in pretty good shape. Charles (Lieutenant Howard) is well and sleeping. So are Lieutenant Stinson, Captain Whittlesey, Lieutenants Steel and Atwood sleeping on the floor near me. I am sitting on this floor near a fireplace . . . writing on my lap, having an inkstand, candlestick, and rder. Lieutenant H. M. Stinson, one of my aids, showed such fearlessness under musketry fire that several commanders noticed him and mentioned him in their reports; so they did Lieutenant A. J. Atwood of my staff. Once my brother and aid, Lieutenant Howard, leaving me with an order, was obliged to cross the most exposed street. On his return he exclaimed, as he rode up, Oh, general, they fired a volley at me, but it passed over my head The other corps (the Ninth) of our grand division was
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 22: battle of Chancellorsville (search)
supplies to Bushbeck at Kelly's Ford, and to see that his men had on hand eight days rations in knapsacks and haversacks. The instruction ended with this sentence: I am directed to inform you confidentially, for your own information and not for publication, that your whole corps will probably move in that direction as early as Monday A. M. Our army at that time numbered for duty about 130,000--First Corps, Reynolds; Second, Couch; Third, Sickles; Fifth, Meade; Sixth, Sedgwick; Eleventh, Howard; Twelfth, Slocum; cavalry corps, Stoneman; reserve artillery, Hunt. The Confederate army opposite numbered about 60,000: four divisions under under Stonewall, two (Anderson's and McLaws's) acting separately, and Stuart's cavalry. General Pendleton brought the reserve artillery under one head. Anderson's and McLaws's belonged to Longstreet's corps, but the remainder over and above these two divisions was at this time absent from the Army of Northern Virginia. Lee's forces occupied the
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