Your search returned 160 results in 56 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
nvoluntary bankruptcy, it has been that our laws might be just rather than severe, and expressive of the principle that a score of rascals had better go unpunished rather than that one honest man should suffer oppression. This is the spirit of the age. Nearly a century and a half ago Blackstone declared that the bankruptcy laws of his time were founded on principles of humanity as well as justice. Modern jurists would not now assure us that such was the case: else to what purpose did John Howard live, or how came it that Dickens moved a sympathetic world with his story of Little Dorrit and the debt-deadened prisoners of Marshalsea. Now, even the day seems passing when, in the words of the gentle Autocrat. The ghostly dun shall worry his sleep, And constables cluster around him; And he shall creep from the wood-hole deep When their spectre eyes have found him. Old things are passing away. Sympathy sits where sternness sat. The nimble debtor is no longer part of a traged
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bentonville, battle of. (search)
ed 10 or 12 miles in the rear of this, in charge of Slocum's wagon-trains. The remainder of the forces were scattered to the south and east, in fancied security. On the morning of the 16th, Sherman left Slocum, nearest the Confederates, to join Howard's troops, which were scattered and moving on over the wretched, muddy road. On March 19, Sherman, while on his way to Howard, heard cannonading on his left wing, but did not think there was anything serious in it. It proved, however, to be a comHoward, heard cannonading on his left wing, but did not think there was anything serious in it. It proved, however, to be a complete surprise. The Confederates, in overwhelming numbers, were found pressing Slocum. A very severe battle ensued, in a densely wooded swamp, dark and wet and dismal. In this encounter, Gen. J. C. Davis conducted much of the battle with great skill and courage, continually cheering his men with assurances of victory. Johnston had assured his men that he was confident of victory, and the troops on both sides fought desperately. Davis had formed General Fearing's brigade to the left and hurl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boydton plank road, battle of. (search)
uld swing around to the west side of Hatcher's Run, sweep across the Boydton road, and seize the Southside Railway. The Boydton road was a few miles west of the Weldon Railway. The movement began on the morning of Oct. 27, 1864, and at nine o'clock the Confederate line was struck, but it was not broken. Warren's corps made its way to the west of hatcher's Run to gain the Confederate rear. Crawford's division got entangled and broken in an almost impassable swamp. An attempt of a part of Howard's corps to form a junction with Crawford's troops was defeated by the tangled swamp. These movements had been eagerly watched by the Confederates. Heth was sent by Hill to strike Hancock. It was done at 4 P. M. The blow first fell upon Pierce's brigade, and it gave way, leaving two guns behind. The Confederates were pursuing, when they, in turn, were struck by the Nationals, driven back, and the two guns recaptured. Fully 1,000 Confederates were made prisoners. Others, in their flight,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bull Run, battles of. (search)
mmand, looked anxiously towards the mountain gaps through which he expected more of his troops from the Shenandoah Valley. Without these he had small hopes of success. There had been a lull in the conflict; and at 2 P. M. it was announced they were not in sight. At that time the Confederates had 10,000 soldiers and twenty-two heavy guns in battle order on the plateau. The Nationals proceeded to attempt to drive them from this vantage-ground. To accomplish this, five brigades — Porter's, Howard's, Franklin's, Wilcox's, and Sherman's — with the batteries of Ricketts, Griffin, and Arnold, and cavalry under Major Palmer, advanced to turn the Confederate left, while Keyes's brigade was sent to annoy them on their right. General Heintzelman accompanied McDowell as his lieutenant in the field, and his division began the attack. Ricketts and Griffin advanced with their troops, and planted their batteries on an elevation that commanded the whole plateau, with the immediate support of Ell
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chancellorsville, battle of (search)
rps, supported by Hancock's division, and forming the centre column, moved along a turnpike. Slocum's entire corps, with Howard's, and its batteries, massed in its rear, comprising the right column, marched along a plank road. The battle was begun Chancellorsville. Meade's corps, with Couch's, formed his left; Slocum's, and a division of Sickles's, his centre, and Howard's his right, with Pleasonton's cavalry near. Lee's forces had the Virginia cavalry of Owen and Wickham on the right, and the Confederates towards Richmond. Sickles pushed forward Birney's division to reconnoitre, followed by two brigades of Howard's corps. Birney charged upon the passing column, and captured a Georgia regiment, 500 strong. but was checked by Confedurst forth from the thickets with his whole force, like an unexpected and terrible tornado, and fell with full force upon Howard's corps (the llth), with tremendous yells, just as they were preparing for supper and repose. Devens's division, on the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chattahoochee, passage of the. (search)
ing of July 3, 1864, General Johnston's Confederate army passed in haste through Marietta, Ga., and on towards the Chattahoochee River, a deep and rapid stream, closely followed by Sherman with the National army, who hoped to strike his antagonist a heavy blow while he was crossing that stream. By quick and skilful movements, Johnston passed the Chattahoochee without much molestation and made a stand behind intrenchments on its left bank. Again Sherman made a successful flanking movement. Howard laid a pontoon bridge 2 miles above the ferry where the Confederates crossed. Demonstrations by the rest of the Nationals made Johnston abandon his position and retreat to another that covered Atlanta. The left of the Confederates rested on the Chattahoochee, and their right on Peach-tree Creek. There the two armies rested some time. On July 10, or sixty-five days after Sherman put his army in motion southward, he was master of the country north and west of the river on the banks of wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
Confederates at Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va., and fought an artillery duel on the 10th. —16. Sortie from Fort Darling upon General Butler's besieging force.—18. General Howard defeats a Confederate force at Adairsville, Ga. Nationals defeat Confederates at Yellow Bayou, La., the latter led by Prince Polignac. A forged Presidential proclamation, calling for 400,000 more troops, was published for the purpose of gold speculation. The perpetrators (Howard and Mallison) were sent to Fort Lafayette.—26. Major-General Foster takes command of the Department of the South. Louisiana State Constitutional Convention adopts a clause abolishing slavery.—27. Eight steameand Booth, while trying to shoot one of his pursuers, was mortally wounded by a shot in the head, fired by Sergeant Corbett, and died in about four hours.—27. General Howard issued an order to the citizens along the line of march of Sherman's army to the national capital to the effect that they were to keep at home; that fora
company; he was subsequently a captain himself, according to the Bridgewater record. Tracing the family back through three generations beyond Jesse, we find John Howard, who was an aide and helper to Miles Standish. This John Howard came from England to America shortly after the arrival of the Mayflower. If a Howard can trace John Howard came from England to America shortly after the arrival of the Mayflower. If a Howard can trace his relatives in the line of heredity to Bridgewater, he is almost sure to belong to the very numerous family of which John Howard was the progenitor. The English connection is not so very clear and to me it does not seem important. It is, however, a source of gratification to a man to find his family tree representing men exceptJohn Howard was the progenitor. The English connection is not so very clear and to me it does not seem important. It is, however, a source of gratification to a man to find his family tree representing men exceptionally industrious and respectable. A little later, during that same winter of the cornshelling incident, another event impressed me. Early one day my mother dressed me and herself with warm wraps and we joined my father in his sleigh. The weather was exceedingly cold, so that to keep me from being nipped with the frost I was
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 58: beginning of Howard University (search)
wise were some of my ideas. He said in substance about this educating the freedmen: General Howard, do you not know that you are educating the colored youth above their business t You will onheir teachings should be of value. Mr. H. D. Nichols moved that the new institution be entitled Howard Theological Seminary. That name was adopted. Mr. Morris and some others were in the outset in was elected the president of the preliminary board. At this session my brother, General C. H. Howard, then assistant commissioner of the district and vicinity, moved a committee to plan a law depare, even in a public address to the students, was imputed by a distinguished English divine to John Howard, the philanthropist. The charter was easily obtained, having seventeen charter members. Theurage it. Several members expressed opposition to the whole project. The work was done by General Howard and by me, acting under his authority. The entire responsibility was thrown upon us. Had it
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 59: institutions of the higher grade; the Barry Farm (search)
ummary for 1903 showed 386 scholars and 17 officers and instructors. The buildings, grounds, and industries are of the best. This Missouri institute has afforded an example of what the faith and work of one good woman can accomplish. 12. The Howard Normal School, of Baltimore, just starting in 1869, has been replaced by the Baltimore City Colored High School. In the latter to-day are 21 instructors and 350 pupils. 13. When I first knew the institution for colored youth at Oxford, Pa., ig land. So I consulted the second comptroller of the Treasury, who agreed with me. I even ventured to interview Chief Justice Chase on the subject. He was kind and approachable and freely advised me in the premises. He said: Without doubt, General Howard, you can use your funds in the way you propose. At last, April 3, 1867, I issued a special order, transferring $52,000 to S. C. Pomeroy, J. R. Elvans, and O. O. Howard as trustees; the amount to be held in trust for three normal collegiat
1 2 3 4 5 6