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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
h Hamilton, James McIntosh, William M. Carr, Thomas Atkinson, David Sprowle, Andrew Miller, James Martin, William Phinney, John Smith, Samuel W. Kinnard, Patrick Dougherty, Michael Cassidy, George Taylor,,Louis G. Chaput, James Ward, Daniel Whitfield, John M. Burns, John Edwards, Adam McCulloch, James Sheridan, John E. Jones, William Gardner, John Preston, William Newland, David Naylor, Charles B. Woram, Thomas Kendrick, James S. Roan, tree, Andrew Jones, James Seanor, William C. Connor, Martin Howard, James Tallentine, Robert Graham, Henry Brutsche, Patrick Colbert, James Haley, John F. Bickford, Charles A. Read, William Smith, William Bond, Charles Moore, George H. Harrison, Thomas Perry, John Hayes, George E. Read, Robert Strahan, James H. Lee, Joachim Pease (colored), William B. Poole, Michael Aheam, Mark G. Ham, John W. Loyd, Charles Baldwin, Alexander Crawford, John Laverty, Benjamin Loyd, David Warren, William Wright, John Sullivan, Robert T. Clifford, Thomas Harding, Perry Wil
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhode Island, (search)
annual rent......1762 Providence Gazette and country journal published in Providence by William Goddard; first issue......Oct. 20, 1762 Jewish synagogue, erected in Newport, dedicated......1763 Brown University, chartered in 1764 as the College of Rhode Island, is opened at Warren......1765 Maidstone, a British vessel, impresses seamen in Newport Harbor; 500 sailors and boys seize one of her boats, drag it to the commons, and burn it......June 4, 1765 Augustus Johnston, Martin Howard, Jr., and Dr. Moffat, who had advocated the Stamp Act, are hanged and burned in effigy at Newport......Aug. 27, 1765 Samuel Ward, of Rhode Island, alone of royal governors, refuses the oath to sustain the Stamp Act taking effect......Nov. 1, 1765 Society The daughters of liberty organized by eighteen young ladies at Dr. Ephraim Bowen's house in Providence......March 4, 1766 British armed sloop Liberty making an unprovoked assault on a Connecticut brig, the people of Newport disman
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
oming. In February, 1765, there appeared at Newport A Letter from a Gentleman at Halifax, to his Friend in Rhode-Island, published anonymously, but written by Martin Howard, a Newport lawyer of repute. In this temperate, logical, and readable pamphlet, the Gentleman at Halifax, replying to Hopkins's labored, ostentatious piece, pette, while Otis, his zeal for debate knowing no provincial bounds, printed A Vindication of the British Colonies against the Aspersions of the Halifax Gentleman. Howard retorted with A Defence of the Letter from a Gentleman at Halifax, to his Friend in Rhode-Island, to which Otis responded with Brief remarks on the defence of the Halifax libel on the British-American-colonies. The tide of patriotism was rising, however, and the populace presently took a hand. Before the summer was over Howard, after being hanged and burned in effigy at Newport, fled to England, and the rights of the colonies were both asserted and proved. No substitute for the stamp
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
20 Home as found, 209, 302 Homer, II, 12, 160, 165, 170, 174, 268, 273, 277, 298, 316 Homer (Bryant), 273 Home sweet home, 220 Homeward bound, 209, 302 Hooker, Thomas, 43, 45-48 Hope Leslie, 310 Hopkins, John, 156 Hopkins, Lemuel, 164, 174 Hopkins, Dr., Samuel, 330 Hopkins, Stephen, 127, 128 Hopkinson, Francis, 122, 167, 177, 215-216 Horace, 161 Horse-Shoe Robinson, 311 Houdetot, Countess de, 199 House of fame, 176 House of night, the, 181, 183 Howard, Martin, 128, 129 Howe, Julia Ward, 223 Howe, Lord, 91, 99 Howe, Sir, William, 145, 226 Hubbard, Rev., William, 25, 27, 28, 47 Hudibras, 112, 118, 171, 172, 173, 287 Hugo, Victor, 269 Humboldt, 187 Hume, 27, 29, 91, 97, 287 Humphreys, David, 164, 169, 174 Hunt, Leigh, 242 Hunter, Governor, Richard, 215 Hunter, William, 96 Hurlbert, W. H., 230 Hutchins, 190 Hutchinson, Anne, 28 Hutchinson, Thomas, 20, 28-30, 37 n.,99, 132, 133 Hutchinson Letters, 134
orrespondence was not come; but to keep up a fellow-feeling with its own constituents, the House, setting an example to be followed by all representative bodies, opened Vote of the House of 12 June, 1766. a gallery for the public to attend its debates. It also sent a grateful Address to the King, Address to the King, in Brad ford, 91. and voted thanks Vote of Thanks, &c., & c., 20 June. to Pitt and to Grafton; and, among many others, to Conway and Barre, to Camden and Shelburne; to Howard, who had refused to draw his sword against the colonies; to Chesterfield, who left retirement for their relief. But as to compensating the sufferers by the late disturbances, it upheld its right of deliberating freely, and would only pro- Chap. XXV.} 1766. June. mise at its next session to act as should then appear just and reasonable. House to the Governor, 25 June—Governor to House, 27 June the—House to Governor, 28 June,—all in Bradford. Also, Bernard's Observations, in Prior Docu<
gh names are omitted. W. S. Johnson to Pitkin, 16 May, 1767; Garth to South Carolina, 17 May, 1767. The persevering Grenville next moved his Test for America; but the House dreaded to re-produce a union W. S. Johnson to his father, 18 May, 1767. of the Colonies. At least, then, renewed Grenville, take some notice of those in America, who have suffered for their loyal support of your sovereignty; and naming Ingersoll, W. S. Johnson to Jared Ingersoll, 16 May, 1767. Hutchinson, Oliver, Howard, and others, he moved an Address in their favor; and this being seconded by Lord North, Chap. XXIX.} 1767. May. passed without dissent. After ordering the Bill to disfranchise New-York, as well as sanctioning the new system of colonial revenue and administration, the House rose; unconscious that it had taken steps which pride would not allow to be recalled; and which, if not retracted, would force the Colonies to unite for Independence. The bitterness against America grew with its i
tant, was enhanced by an unprecedented extent of the right of appeal from the county court to the remote superior court; where a farmer of small means would be ruined by the expense of attendance with his witnesses. We tell you in the anguish of our souls, said they to the Governor, we cannot, dare not go to law with our powerful antagonists; that step, whenever taken, will terminate in the ruin of ourselves and families. Regulators to Gov. Tryon, 1768. Besides, the Chief Justice was Martin Howard, Compare Sabine's Loyalists. a profligate time-server, raised to the bench as a convenient reward for having suffered in the time of the Stamp Act, and ever ready to use his place as a screen for the dishonest profits of men in office, and the instrument of political power. Never yet had Chap. XXXV.} 1768. Sept. the tribunal of justice been so mocked. Goaded Tyree Harris's Advertisement. by oppression and an intuitive jealousy of frauds, men associated as Regulators, A pla
ve and praise of a commonwealth. John Hayward's Civil and Political History of the State of Tennessee, 39, 40. He was followed to the West, by men from the same Province with himself, where the people had no respite from the insolence of mercenary attorneys and officers, and were subjected to every sort of rapine and extortion. Governor Martin to the Secretary of State, Hillsborough, 30 August, 1772. There the Courts of law offered no redress. Petition of Orange County to Chief Justice Howard, and to the Associate justices Moore and Henderson, without date; presented perhaps to Henderson, 29 Sept. 1770. See Henderson to Tryon, 29 Sept. 1770, and inclosed in Tryon to Hillsborough, 20 Oct. 1770. At the inferior Courts the Justices who themselves were implicated in the pilfering of public money, named the juries. The Sheriff and receivers of taxes were in arrears for near seventy thousand pounds, which they had extorted from the people, and of which more than two thirds