hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
A propos, when he came to call upon us, our girl announced him as Mr. Miller --our conversation ran upon literature, and I had the exquisite discrimination to tell him that except Wordsworth, there were no great poets in England now. Fortunately he soon took his departure, and thus prevented me from expressing the light estimation in which I hold his poetry. On Thursday Morpeth gave us a beautiful dinner--thirteen servants in the hall, powdered heads, Lady Carlisle very like Morpeth--Lady Mary Howard not pretty; Duchess of Sutherland, beautiful, but like Lizzie Hogg. They gave us strawberries, the first we have tasted, green peas, pines, peaches, apricots, grapes — all very expensive. We stayed until nearly twelve--they were very gracious-Annie and I are little people here — we are too young(?) to be noticed — we are very demure, and have learned humility. Chev receives a great deal of attention, ladies press forward to look at him, roll up their eyes, and exclaim, Oh! He is su<
80, 93, 146, 147, 163, 272, 389. Verse by, I, 140. Homans, Mrs., Charles, II, 99, 354. Home Rule, II, 4, 166. Homer, I, 323; II, 5. Hooker, Joseph, I, 192. Hooper, Ellen, II, 142. Hooper, Samuel, I, 239. Hopedale, II, 253. Horace, I, 153, 192; II, 374, 282. Horry, Peter, I, 10, 11, 12. Horticulture, I, 23, 24. Hosmer, Harriet G., I, 271. Hosmer, Martha, II, 325. Houghton, R. M. Milnes, Lord, I, 82, 84, 85; II, 5, 9. Howard, Charles, I, 267. Howard, Lady, Mary, I, 85. Howard Athenaeum, I, 204, 225. Howe, Senator, I, 239. Howe, Fannie, I, 298; II, 80, 87, 201, 227, 266, 351, 364. Letter to, II, 338. Howe, Florence, see Hall. Howe, H. M., I, 130, 131, 228, 237, 238, 265, 297, 298; II, 71, 80, 84, 87, 119, 150, 201, 202, 227, 235, 266, 278, 283, 338, 346, 350, 351, 413. Letter to, II, 397. Howe, J. N., Sr., I, 364. Howe, J. N., Jr., I, 258. Howe, Julia R., see Anagnos. Howe, Julia Ward, ancestry, I, 3-17; birth, 18; c
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
the State, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1835, at Columbus, where he then made his home. Being a young man of fine intellectual endowments, honorable ambition, and the most indefatigable industry, he quickly began to rise in the profession. In 1837 he was appointed by Governor McDonald, solicitor-general of the Chattahoochee circuit to fill a vacancy, and in 1838 was elected by the general assembly for a full term of four years. Upon his marriage in the fall of the next year with Mary Howard, only daughter of Col. Seaborn Jones, a very eminent lawyer of Columbus, he resigned his position and formed a partnership with Colonel Jones in the practice of law. In 1850, he and Martin J. Crawford and James N. Ramsey were delegates to the Southern convention at Nashville, Tenn. In the fall of 1853, when less than forty years of age, he was elected one of the justices of the Supreme court of Georgia, a position he held for the full term of six years. His decisions are noted for clearne
Court, Tuesday, Nov. 18th. --Lizzie, slave of Dr. Ellison, arrested by Watchman Wasserman, was committed for going at large. William, slave of Talbott & Brother, charged with making a felonious assault on Henry Mayo, manager of a farm owned by the Talbotts, in Chesterfield, last Friday night, having been picked up in this city by the police, and brought before the Mayor, was ordered to be sent to Manchester for trial. Alick, slave of Mrs. Mary Rose, and Robert, slave of Miss Mary Howard, were arraigned for stealing $15 from Daniel Rose. The latter not appearing, they were discharged from custody, none of the police officers knowing anything of the transaction. Wm. Irwin and John Bastain, two youths, were arraigned for surreptitiously possessing themselves of a bed-quilt belonging to Bridget McDonough. Five little boys were introduced to show how the article in question was sequestered. Mrs. McDonough being sworn, demonstrated the manner in which the quilt was l