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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of battery Gregg-General Lane's reply to General Harris. (search)
one of Harris's brigade were in the fort, as a copy of Lieutenant Snow's letter accompanied my statement. I afterwards wrote direct to General Lee, enclosed a copy of my last official report and copies of the letters of Lieutenants Snow, Craige, Howard and Rigler (in all of which it is admitted that some of Harris's brigade took part in the defence), and called his attention to the injustice that had been done my command in the articles that had been published. General Lee acknowledged the recMahone's division, I made the same statement that I did to Generals Lee and Wilcox. Lastly, in the January No., 1877, of the Southern Historical Society Papers I reiterate my statement, and give copies of the letters of Lieutenants Snow, Craige, Howard and Rigler--all gallant and meritorious young officers. From this it will be readily seen that I did not wait fifteen years in utter silence, and that I and my Lieutenants do not claim for our brigade all the honors of the defence of Fort Gregg.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Opinion of a United States officer of the Depopulation of Atlanta. (search)
th extreme manifestations of joy. The city was a valuable railroad center of the South, and the seat of some of its most. important and necessary manufactures, and its fall was a heavy and discouraging blow to the Confederacy. Sherman decided to give rest to his army, and therefore, instead of pressing his advantage in the field with twice the force that Hood could bring to resist him, he recalled his troops on the 5th, and assigned the occupancy of Atlanta to General Thomas, East Point to Howard, and Decatur to Schofield. He also took steps to depopulate the city, so as to avoid the necessity of feeding the inhabitants, of keeping it in strong garrison, and of burdening the railroad with supplies for the sustenance of an unfriendly population when he should again resume field operations. He therefore peremptorily required that all the citizens and families resident in Atlanta should go away, giving to each the option to go South or North, as their interests or feelings dictated.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. (search)
far too lenient, in view of the facts, to General Howard. The manner in which Sedgwick's slowness air. Much less so is the failure to criticise Howard for his mismanagement of the Federal right flaont. At half-past 9 Hooker ordered Slocum and Howard to look well to the right flank, as the enemy y one of Slocum's divisions and a brigade from Howard, who was himself present. Sickles's movementsthat Sickles was out of supporting distance of Howard when the Eleventh corps was attacked at 6 P. M. Howard, Sickles, Hooker himself, became possessed with the notion that Lee was retreating, and irrrection of his march; though Hooker had warned Howard early in the day to be on his guard from a poshis flank, yet, at 6 P. M., in broad daylight, Howard is completely surprised, his lines taken in flhe rout, but is soon carried away. In an hour Howard's 10,000 men have been scattered in disgracefusible for this disaster, and but mildly blames Howard. Surely history affords few instances of grea[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's division. (search)
o receive recruits promiscuously, and the four batteries usually averaged but three guns each. of New Orleans was assigned to Longstreet's division when this movement commenced, and continued to serve with the division and corps until the latter came to Georgia in September, 1863. After crossing the Rappahannock, a halt of a few days was made, after which the arty retired behind the Rapidan, about the 23d of March. The enemy having occupied Manassas, pushed out a reconnoissance under General Howard, which, about the 26th, had a small skirmish with Stuart holding the Rappahannock as a picket line, and then withdrew. Meanwhile, after considerable opposition from the President, who favored a direct advance upon Manassas, General McClellan had sucseeded in instituting his desired campaign, an advance upon Richmond by way of the Peninsula, although under certain restrictions by Mr. Lincoln, which almost appear ridiculous. His unwilling consent was granted, provided-- First. That
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
The annual meeting of the Confederate army and Navy Society of Maryland was held at Raine's Hall, Baltimore, on the evening of the 19th of January, 1882, McHenry, Howard, President, W. L. Ritter, Secretary. The regular routine business was transacted, and the following officers were elected:--President, Lieutenant McHenry Howard;Lieutenant McHenry Howard; Vice-Presidents, Major-General Isaac R. Trimble, Major W. Stuart Symington, Lieutenant D. G. Wright, Captain W. L. Ritter, Sergeant Frederick Ruff, Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert, Major Harry Gilmer, Private D. Ridgely Howard, Private John F. Hayden, Lieutenant Chapman Maupin, Captain J. Blythe Allston, Lieutenant Winfield Peal I. R. Trimble; Brigadier-General George H. Steuart; Lieutenant-Colonel Jas. R. Herbert; Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Carter Smith; Captain Jno. W. Torsch; Captain McHenry Howard: Lieutenant W. P. Zollinger; Sergeant Wm. H. Pope; Private Ridgley Howard; Private George C. Jenkins; Private Frederick Marston. Corresponding Secretary,
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
spital detail and attended to on the spot by our gallant medical officers, who in every action were as close to us as the line of field officers. Wishing to change direction, the order was given, Battalion right wheel! and it swung round like an arm. Coming to a small rise which would shelter the men, they were halted, brought to a shoulder, then an order, then lie down. Colonel Johnson went forward to reconnoiter, and returning quickly commanded, Up, men, and forward! Just then Capt. McHenry Howard of General Winder's staff rode up and said, General Winder thinks you are not strong enough to take those batteries. He directs that you wait until he can bring up the Stonewall brigade to your support! In a minute the Stonewall brigade was found on the right, and General Winder directed Colonel Johnson to take direction of the line and charge. As they rose the crest, the batteries became visible near the McGee house, the orchard and sunken road between us and the McGee house bein
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
, Francis Farr. Company G—Captain, Wilson C. Nicholas. FirstLieu-tenant, Alexander Cross. Second-Lieutenant, Edward Deppish. First-Sergeant, John J. Platt. Sergeants, James Farrell, Louis Neidhammer, James Shields. Corporals, George Ross, Eli Fishpan, Samuel Kirk, Charles Fercoit. Musician, Andrew Myers. Company H—Captain, Wm. H. Murray. FirstLieu-tenant, George Thomas. Second-Lieutenant, Francis X. Ward, Richard T. Gilmor, W. P. Dollinger. FirstSer-geant, John H. Sullivan. Sergeants, McHenry Howard, James Lyon, Chapman B. Briscoe. Corporals, Edward Johnson, Richard C. Mackall, Clapham Murray, Wm. S. Lemmon. Company I—Captain, Michael S. Robertson. FirstLieu-tenant, Hugh Mitchell. Second-Lieutenant, Hezekiah H. Bean, Eugene Diggs. First-Sergeant, John J. Brawner. Sergeants, John H. Stone, F. L. Higdon, Wm. H. Rison, Warren W. Ward. Corporals, Z. Francis Freeman, Francis L. Higdon, Thomas I. Green, Thomas L. Hannon. Company C (Second)—Captain, Edmund Barry. First-Li
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland Confederate monument at Gettysburg. (search)
ent arms, and then saluted and cheered the command as it passed them to take the right of line. The march to the battlefield was then taken up in the following order: The Fifth regiment, couriers Messrs. Emmett Brown, J. B. Brown, sons of Captain J. B. Brown of the Third North Carolina infantry, M. H. Herbert, son of General Herbert, and J. Duncan McKim, son of Rev. Dr. Randolph H. McKim; General George H. Steuart and staff-officers; Lieutenant Randolph H. McKim, chief of staff; Lieutenant McHenry Howard, Colonel W. S. Symington, Colonel H. Kyd Douglass, Captain Frederick M. Colston, Captain Frank Markoe, Captain John Donnell Smith, Private George C. Jenkins, Lieutenant Fielder C. Slingluff, Private Gresham Hough, Captain J. S. Maury, Midshipman John T. Mason, Captain C. M. Morris, Midshipman J. Thomas Scharf, Private Spencer C. Jones, Corporal Robert M. Blundon, Sergeant William H. Pope, Private George T. Hollyday, Captain John B. Brown; the Second Maryland regiment; First Marylan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ty-five guns as if they were about to be torn and rent by some powerful convulsion. In the words of General Hancock, in reference to the performance of the opposing batteries, their artillery fire was the most terrific cannonade and the most prolonged, one possibly hardly ever paralleled. For more than an hour this fierce artillery conflict continued, when the Federal guns began to slacken their fire under the heavy blows of the Confederate batteries, and ere long sank into silence. General Howard in an article in the Atlantic Monthly, in speaking of the effect produced by this splendid work of the artillery at Gettysburg, says: I have thought that the fearful exposure of General Meade's headquarters, where so much havoc was occasioned by the enemy's artillery, had so impressed him, that he did not at first realize the victory he had won. But Gettysburg was not the only field of which I wish to speak. In his report of the first battle of Fredericksburg, General Lee says:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Lee then occupied a position between the two great wings of Hooker's army, either of which was numerically able to crush him. It was a position of great danger. Hooker presses his grand army down to Chancellorsville, with his right commanded by Howard. Lee confronts him at Chancellorsville, and in the meantime Stonewall Jackson works himself around and strikes, like a thunderbolt, Howard's right wing and doubles it back. Hooker's center is held at bay by Lee, but in the meantime Sedgwick croHoward's right wing and doubles it back. Hooker's center is held at bay by Lee, but in the meantime Sedgwick crosses his 30,000 troops over the Rappahannock, and attacks the fortifications in rear of Fredericksburg and captures them, and then advances on Lee. Lee, having checked and to some extent routed Hooker's right and center, withdraws a portion of his troops and assails Sedgwick. After a bloody fight, Sedgwick is driven back across the Rappahannock. Hooker is disabled by a shock of cannon ball, and he turns his army over to General Couch and retires across the river. He had Lee just where he want
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