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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
94; in 1862, $959.65; in 1863, $1,800.06; in 1864, $1,900.96; in 1865, $855.64. Total amount, $5,604.25. The ladies of Southwick did their full share of patriotic labor in aid of the soldiers all through the war. Springfield Incorporated as a town May 14, 1636; as a city April 12, 1852. Population in 1860, 15,199; in 1865, 22,038. Valuation in 1860, $8,669,806; in 1865, $13,379,212. The mayor in 1861 was Stephen C. Bemis; aldermen, Henry Gray, Ephraim W. Bond, H. N. Case, Nathaniel Howard, Charles Woodman, Amos Call, William Smith, A. J. Plumer. In 1862, Stephen C. Bemis, mayor; Henry Gray, E. W. Bond, H. N. Case, T. W. Wason, Horace Kibbe, Horace Smith, William Smith, H. S. Eveans, aldermen. In 1863, Henry Alexander, Jr., mayor; Justin M. Cooley, William Patton, William K. Baker, Daniel L. Harris, William Bodertha, Horace Smith, Virgil Perkins, Andrew J. Plumer, aldermen. In 1864, Henry Alexander, Jr., mayor; Norman W. Talcott, William Patton, Albert D. Briggs, Frede
ree negro slaves should become free; one was to be free as soon as he should recover from his sickness, and in the meantime to be carefully provided for; one in four years, and the third, who was young, in seven years. Each of his slaves was to receive a legacy of ten pounds on the day of his freedom. A legacy of three pounds was bestowed on a former slave. After the death of his wife, who was to have a life-estate in his property, he bequeathed his estate to his cousins, John Howard, Nathaniel Howard, Joseph Howard, Elisha Howard, and Mary Mitchell, all of Bridgewater,--with the special provision that Joseph Howard should have twenty pounds more than either of the other legatees, if he would make his slave, Stephen, free; otherwise he should have no part of the real estate, which was appraised at £ 307. This provision was probably complied with; for the heirs of Joseph, having acquired the rights of the other legatees, sold the real estate 8 Mar. 1723-4 to John Bradish. Trowbridg
ree negro slaves should become free; one was to be free as soon as he should recover from his sickness, and in the meantime to be carefully provided for; one in four years, and the third, who was young, in seven years. Each of his slaves was to receive a legacy of ten pounds on the day of his freedom. A legacy of three pounds was bestowed on a former slave. After the death of his wife, who was to have a life-estate in his property, he bequeathed his estate to his cousins, John Howard, Nathaniel Howard, Joseph Howard, Elisha Howard, and Mary Mitchell, all of Bridgewater,--with the special provision that Joseph Howard should have twenty pounds more than either of the other legatees, if he would make his slave, Stephen, free; otherwise he should have no part of the real estate, which was appraised at £ 307. This provision was probably complied with; for the heirs of Joseph, having acquired the rights of the other legatees, sold the real estate 8 Mar. 1723-4 to John Bradish. Trowbridg