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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
icks, after the manner of whipping brutes. Upon one occasion, when a guard discovered a beef bone thrown from the window of number six, he made all of the prisoners form in line and touch the ground with the fore finger without bending the knee. All who could not do this were beaten. A young man was shot for picking up snow to quench his thirst, when the hydrant had been closed for several days. New and cruel punishments were inflicted, as whim, passion, or pure malignity indicated. Wm. Howard, a Baptist minister, sixty years of age, of Graves county, Kentucky, was taken, with his daughters, and beaten over the head with a sabre, until the sabre was broken; and he was otherwise cruelly treated. Lucius T. Harding writes that on the 14th of October the large steamer General Foster came to his place. The sailors entered the house, kicked his sick children, and robbed him of everything. That white officers led negro raids into Westmoreland and Richmond counties. Women were vio
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
Beatty, Col. Benjamin C. Grider: 79th Ind., Col. Frederick Knefler; 9th Ky., Col. Benjamin C. Grider, Lieut.-Col. George H. Cram; 11th Ky., Maj. Erasmus L. Mottley; 19th Ohio, Maj. Charles F. Manderson. Brigade loss: k, 67; w, 371; m, 83 = 521. Second (late Fourteenth) Brigade, Col. James P. Fyffe: 44th Ind., Col. William C. Williams (c), Lieut.-Col. Simeon C. Aldrich; 86th Ind., Lieut.-Col. George F. Dick; 13th Ohio, Col. Joseph G. Hawkins (k), Maj. Dwight Jarvis, Jr.; 59th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. William Howard. Brigade loss: k, 78; w, 239; m, 240 = 557. Third (late Twenty-third) Brigade, Col. Samuel W. Price: 35th Ind., Col. Bernard F. Mullen; 8th Ky., Lieut.-Col. Reuben May, Maj. Green B. Broaddus; 21st Ky., Lieut.-Co l. James C. Evans; 51st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Richard W. McClain; 99th Ohio, Col. Peter T. Swaine (w), Lieut.-Col. John E. Cummins. Brigade loss: k, 79; w, 361; m, 143 = 583. Artillery, Capt. George R. Swallow: 7th Ind., Capt. George R. Swallow; B, Pa., Lieut. Alanson J. Ste
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
they had, fortunately, become harmless. In consequence of this, the seamen became somewhat careless in handling them, and one torpedo exploded, killing and wounding the following named persons: Killed — C. E. Milliken (Ord. Sea.). Mortally wounded — Isaac Young (Ord. Sea.); John Miller (Sea.), Robert G. White (Sea.), George Thompson (Sea.)--all of U. S. S. Seminole. Wounded seriously--Pilot Martin Freeman, U. S. S. Hartford; Acting-Ensign John White; H. J. O'Brien (Qr. Mr.); William Howard (Lds.); James McDonald (Sea.), all of the Metacomet; and Boatswain Charles White, of the Seminole. Slightly wounded — Henry Chester (Sea.); Edward Mann (O. S.); Thomas Webster (Lds.)--U. S. S. Seminole. These men had passed through all the danger of battle, and had stood to their guns like heroes, and now, when they might hope to live and enjoy part of the honor won in this great victory, they were snatched from life or maimed forever by an infernal machine, which the officers of t<
e panting, thirsty, fagged defenders of their country's flag, and never doubting they had honestly done their best. Meanwhile, an army-wagon had been standing since we first met the panic in the same spot before this house. I note this particular wagon, lettered Co. H, 3d Regt., Me., because it is noteworthy that it stood in line in one place all these two hours; and the driver said, in answer to my question, that he should move on as soon as he had orders. As this is the regiment of Col. Howard, of West-Point, whom I (as one of those reception committees ) had learned to respect and admire in New York, I talked with the teamster about the doings of the day and of the Colonel, who was reported killed. During the brief panic, he had, like his neighbors, thrown overboard all his cargo, except five bags of oats. So, on these bags we persuaded him to spread six of the wounded soldiers, to be jolted over the road, in the absence of ambulances, which at this place at least were invis
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
e panting, thirsty, fagged defenders of their country's flag, and never doubting they had honestly done their best. Meanwhile, an army-wagon had been standing since we first met the panic in the same spot before this house. I note this particular wagon, lettered Co. H, 3d Regt., Me., because it is noteworthy that it stood in line in one place all these two hours; and the driver said, in answer to my question, that he should move on as soon as he had orders. As this is the regiment of Col. Howard, of West-Point, whom I (as one of those reception committees ) had learned to respect and admire in New York, I talked with the teamster about the doings of the day and of the Colonel, who was reported killed. During the brief panic, he had, like his neighbors, thrown overboard all his cargo, except five bags of oats. So, on these bags we persuaded him to spread six of the wounded soldiers, to be jolted over the road, in the absence of ambulances, which at this place at least were invis
r the Union. Squire McClung, who was one of the commissioners to receive the votes, remarked that it was the first Union vote polled that day. As he said this, Wm. Howard, a violent secessionist, seized Mr. Strunk by the throat, dragged him some distance to a bank six feet high, over which he was thrown. With the assistance of others, Howard then dragged him to a pond, into which they threw him. He crawled out, and was pushed back two or three times. Howard drew a pistol from his pocket, and would have shot Mr. Strunk, but for the interference of a person in the crowd. It was finally proposed that he should have three hours in which to leave the place,Howard drew a pistol from his pocket, and would have shot Mr. Strunk, but for the interference of a person in the crowd. It was finally proposed that he should have three hours in which to leave the place, and he did leave within the specified time, abandoning all his property but such small articles as he was able to sell to the neighbors, who sympathized with him. One of them loaned him money, to enable him to reach Washington, which he did by the way of the Manassas Gap and Fairfax Court-House.--N. Y. Times, June 9.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
tersburg. William Mimms, killed at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864. Corporal J. B. Nuckolls, killed at Sharpsburg, September 17, 1862. John Preskitt, killed at Gettysburg. Ensign R. H. Stafford, killed at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864. W. B. (Tobe) Ward, killed near Petersburg. P. W. Chappell, killed at Petersburg. Lucius Williams, killed at Winchester. Isaac Eason, killed 19th May near Spotsylvania C. H. J. T. Eberhart, killed at Snicker's Gap, July 18, 1864. William Howard, killed at Petersburg. The following died of wounds or disease: S. M. Blackburn, C. H. Cobb, B. Fitzpatrick, G. P. Grimmett, M. G. Holloway, H. H. McPhaul, W. A. Noble, P. Philpot, W. P. Bowdon, W. F. Chesson, J. M. Germany, A. A. Gillespie, R. L. Hairston, W. J. Moody, R. J. Nobles, died in prison, S. L. Roberts, S. G. Starke, R. T. Simmons, M. W. Wright, R. P. Wynn, E. H. Strobell, A. J. Veasey, C. F. Wagner. The following have died since the war: R. F. Ligon, Geo. Jones, J. H. E
T Tacony, C. S. S.: captured, VI., 292, 294, 318; VII., 123. Tacony, U. S. S., III., 342. Taft, William Howard, President of the United States: I., 7, 11, 18, 50; his foreword to a semi-Centennial retrospect, I., 57; X., 138. Taggart, Dr. L, 179. Tahoma, U. S. S., VI., 314. Talcott, T. M. R., V., 108, 256, 304; X., 27. Taliaferro, W. B.: II., 41, 342; III., 326; X., 105. Tallahassee, Fla., III., 346. Tallahassee,, C. S. S., VI., 298. Tallahatchie, Miss., II., 206. Tallahatchie River, Miss., VI., 208. Talmage, T. DeW., IX., 304, 310. Talty's Fifers and Drummers, VIII., 235. Tammany Hall, N. Y. City: contributions to Union cause, VIII., 104. Tanner, J., X., 296. Tappan, J. C., X., 257. Tasting the soup, VIII., 83. Tattnall, J.: I, 354; VI, 87, 156, 157, 182, 270. Taylor, Dick, III., 316. Taylor, E., I, 248. Taylor, G. W.: II., 43, 322; scene of death, IX., 75, X.,
The Disturbance at "Solitude." --The Mayer yesterday discharged Fountain Rowe as a party implicated in the felonious assault made on John S. Curry, at "Solitude," on Cary st., on the 18th of March. Curry, who was present, testified as to the active agency of Geo. and Beverly Bloomer in producing the fracture of his skull, and they were remanded for indictment and trial. The following witnesses and participants were recognized to appear and testify in the case, viz: John L. Curry, Granville Montelle, Philip Snyder, Ro. Ratcliffe, Wm. H. Dixon, Adolph Werdmeyer, Sam. Chappell, Wm. Howard, Thomas F. Moseley, and Jas. Dundelfunker. Curry is recovering from his injuries.
Stealing beef. --William, slave to Joseph G. Watt, was convicted before Justice Sadler, last Saturday morning, of stealing beef from William Howard, and sentenced to the man.
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