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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 28 4 Browse Search
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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 1: organization of the regiment. (search)
any from Cambridge and Capt. Wilson's Company from Boston. The field officers were: Edward W. Hinks—Colonel. Arthur F. Devereux—Lieutenant Colonel. Henry J. Howe—Major John C. Chadwick—Adjutant. Levi Shaw—Quarter Master. J. Franklin Dyer—Surgeon Josiah N. Willard—Assistant Surgeon. Joseph C. Cromack—Chapldarker blue, plentifully furnished with buttons, and a fez cap of the same color. Special Order No.369, dated A. G. O., Boston, July 27, 1861, designated Capt. Henry J. Howe, of Haverhill, a graduate of Harvard University, who had previously been commissioned in the Fourteenth Regiment, as Major of the Nineteenth Regiment, now i were commissioned on Aug. 22. The roster follows: Field staff. Colonel, Edward W. Hinks, of Lynn; Lieutenant Colonel, Arthur F. Devereux, of Salem; Major, Henry J. Howe, of Haverhill; Surgeon, J. Franklin Dyer, of Gloucester; Assistant Surgeon, Josiah N. Willard, of Boston; Chaplain, Joseph Levi Shaw, of Rockport.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 4: the balls Bluff disaster. (search)
an cavalry. These were followed by the First Minnesota, part of the Twentieth New York, the Seventh Michigan and Thirty-fourth New York. One company of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Company K, (the Tiger Zouaves), under Capt. Wass and Major Howe, and the Andrew Sharpshooters, under Capt. Saunders, of Salem, also crossed the river. The whole command was under Brig. Gen. Gorman, and the object was to make a reconnoissance along Goose Creek. Early in the day the VanAllan cavalry made eft leg. Reinforcements were not sent forward and the little band retreated, but not until they had completely turned the head of the enemy's force by their deadly fire. The Tiger Zouaves behaved bravely and were deserving of great praise. Major Howe, of the Nineteenth Massachusetts, who commanded them, proved himself a gallant officer and won the entire confidence of his command by his conduct upon the field. General Lander expressed himself as highly pleased with this little band of 150
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 5: life at camp Benton. (search)
Sir:— The general commanding directs me to express to you the gratification with which he noticed the advancement in drill made by the regiment under your command, as exhibited at the review of yesterday. So much progress in so short a time gives promise of admirable results and reflects great credit upon both instructors and instructed. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Chas. Stewart, A. A. G. At this time there were six Harvard men in the regiment,— Maj. Henry Jackson Howe, '59; Asst. Surg. Josiah Newell Willard, '57; Capt. George Wellington Batchelder, '59; Sergt. Maj. Edgar Marshall Newcomb,‘60; First Lieut. John Hodges,. Jr., ‘61 and Charles Brooks Brown, '56. It was not an infrequent occurrence for the regimental band to include among its selections the delightful melody of Fair Harvard in their honor. The chief thing of interest, beside work, at Poolesville seemed to be to stockade the tents and to build a fire-place which would not smoke t
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 10: the march to the Chickahominy. (search)
ach day, and when it was nearly full someone stole it. It rained constantly. Orders were given once a week to allow the men to change their underclothing, taking turns at it a few at a time. Occasionally permission would be given to unbuckle the roundabout while they slept, but the cross belt was not allowed to be removed from the shoulder. This constant expectation of sudden attack proved a terrible strain upon them. Firing between the pickets was very frequent. On one occasion, Major Howe, field officer of the day, came galloping out of the woods, the picket firing became more rapid, the reserves were hastily summoned into line behind the earthworks, the artillery stood to their guns in the redoubts and, in silence, everyone awaited the attack. Gradually the firing died out, the tension was relaxed and no attack was made. These sudden alarms occurred often and were responsible for the broken down and shattered nervous systems of many of the men who received no wounds. Sh
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 11: battle of Oak Grove. (search)
side men begin to fall, and orders come thick and fast, the sweat oozes from every pore. It is not fear, but uncertainty that so strains the nerves and makes men live days in every moment. Colonel Hinks says in his report: My regiment performed to my satisfaction, there being no exceptions to the general good behaviour of officers and men in the performance of the difficult and trying duties required of them. I may, however, without injustice to others, acknowledge my indebtedness to Major Howe and Adjutant Chadwick for their assistance and gallant bearing upon the field under the heaviest fire, and particularly commend the bravery of Corporal O'Rourke, of Company E, who gallantly siezed the color (the flag of our Commonwealth) when its bearer, Sergt. Samuel H. Smith, was shot down, and continued to bear it through the fight. Moses Short, of Company G, died of his wounds. He was shot in the corner of his mouth, the ball passing down the neck, over the shoulder, down the back
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 14: from Malvern Hill to Harrison's Landing. (search)
Co. K.Private Edwin B. Pratt. Private John Hogan. Private Jacob Grau. casualities, June 28, 1862. wounded: Co. B.Private John Jordan. Private William Delaney. casualities, June 29, 1862. Second Lieutenant Lysander J. Hume, of Company K, sick on march, captured by enemy. Reported Missing in Action. Private Benjamin A. Stone, Company H, died of disease on the march from Fair Oaks. casualities, June 30, 1862—Glendale. killed in action or died of wounds: Major Henry J. Howe. First Lieutenant David Lee, Company E. Co. A.Private Jonathan Hudson. Private Volney P. Chase. Co. C.Private George W. Mace. Private Benjamin F. Stevens. Private Samuel C. Jellison. Co. E.Private Edward Maguire. Co. F.Corporal Thomas Welch. Corporal Lyman Blackington. Private Lewis Westacott. Private Harrison E. Case. Co. G.Private Andrew G. Jacobs. Private Henry Eacott. Private James O'Connell. Private George R. White. Private George Lucy. Co. H.Private John Smith.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 44: in camp at
Bailey's Cross Roads
. Muster out. (search)
omac, current series, and on the following morning began its return journey toward Readville, Mass. The command left Washington at 10 A. M., Baltimore at 4.45 P. M. on the same day; arrived in Philadelphia at 6 A. M. on July 1st. It is needless to say that from the Philadelphians the regiment experienced a cordial and substantial welcome at the Old Cooper Shop. Leaving Philadelphia at 2 P. M. on July 1, the men reached New York on the same night and there the regiment received from Colonel Howe, his associates and friends, a reception worthy of it and them. Leaving New York at 3 P. M., July 2, the regiment arrived at Readville at 9 A. M. on July 3, to await final discharge and payment. The men were allowed to leave for their homes immediately and with only the delay necessary to dispose of guns and equipments, they took advantage of the opportunity. Of the 37 commissioned officers who left Massachusetts with the regiment in 1861, only 1 returned,—Colonel Edmund Rice who w
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
in action, Dec. 13, ‘62,Fredericksburg, Va. Howard, Kendrick, priv., (I), Aug. 10, ‘61; 18; M. O. in Co. K, Aug. 28, ‘64. Howe, Charles, sergt., (K), Aug. 14, ‘62; 24; disch. expir. term, Aug. 28, ‘64. Howe, Henry, Maj., (F & G), Aug. 3, ‘61; 25; Howe, Henry, Maj., (F & G), Aug. 3, ‘61; 25; killed in action, June 30, ‘62 at Glendale. Howe, John C., priv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 20; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; deserted Mar. 13, ‘64 while on furlough. Howe, Wm. O. M., priv., band, Sept. 9, ‘61; 14; disch. Nov. 17, ‘61. Hoyt, Daniel, priv., (E),Howe, John C., priv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 20; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; deserted Mar. 13, ‘64 while on furlough. Howe, Wm. O. M., priv., band, Sept. 9, ‘61; 14; disch. Nov. 17, ‘61. Hoyt, Daniel, priv., (E), May 13, ‘64; 34; died Sept. 19, ‘64, Andersonville, Ga. Hoyt, John L., sergt., (D), Aug. 27, ‘62; 24; died of w'nds, July 5, ‘63, Gettysburg. Hubbard, Charles, priv., (—), June 13, ‘64; 21; sub.; N. F.R. Hubbard, Charles, priv.,(A), Apr. 22, ‘64; 2Howe, Wm. O. M., priv., band, Sept. 9, ‘61; 14; disch. Nov. 17, ‘61. Hoyt, Daniel, priv., (E), May 13, ‘64; 34; died Sept. 19, ‘64, Andersonville, Ga. Hoyt, John L., sergt., (D), Aug. 27, ‘62; 24; died of w'nds, July 5, ‘63, Gettysburg. Hubbard, Charles, priv., (—), June 13, ‘64; 21; sub.; N. F.R. Hubbard, Charles, priv.,(A), Apr. 22, ‘64; 23; abs. pris. since June 22, ‘64; not heard from since. Hubner, Frederick, priv., (D), July 31, ‘63; 29; sub.; transf. to 20 M. V. Jan. 14, ‘64. Hudson, Charles, priv., (A), July
oker, Joseph, General, 80, 131, 133, 13-, 142, 164, 177, 178, 195, 199, 200, 211, 212, 213, 316 Hopkinson, William,................................ 324 Horstman, Alfred,.......................................... 292 Hovey, Samuel D.,....................................5, 43 Howard, Daniel P.,..................1............... 186 Howard, Gen. O. O., 123, 124, 134, 139, 158, 161, 172, 177, 178, 179, 185, 196, 225 Howe, Frank E.,................................................... 11 Howe, Henry J., 1, 3, 4, 14, 16, 21, 32, 34, 35, 49, 50, 77, 83, 96, 97, 99, 105, 112 Howe, John C.,............................................... 146, 286 Howe, W. C. M.,................................................... 43 Hoyt, Daniel,...................................................331, 341 Hoyt, John L.,.................................................. 248 Hoyt, William H.,.................................................. 249 Hubner, Fred W.,............................................
, the night bivouac; The roll of drum will never more Arouse us for the foe's attack. And as we clasp the hands today, And old familiar faces greet, Remembered are those far away, Whose hearts are with us while we meet. Nor unforgotten those who fell, And sleep today in sunny lands; On breezy hill, in quiet dell, In graves dug by their comrades' hands. They were as noble, brave and true As ever followed noisy drum; Their silent ranks pass in review, With noiseless step, and voices dumb. Brave Howe is riding at their head, Tall and graceful, but ashy pale, Just as he looked when, cold and dead, We dug his grave at sad Glendale. Another rides with that silent host— Boyd, the hero of many fields— Who bravely fell at duty's post, Just as the foe the contest yields. And there George Batchelder we see, Gentle and true, and bravest of men, And there steps gallant David Lee, And Mumford's manly form we ken. Newcomb is there, with thoughtful face, In that battalion weird and vast; And brave Tom