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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 30 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for J. W. Howe or search for J. W. Howe in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
n the steps of the house, he, fortunately for me, undermost and quite stout of person; otherwise the shock would have been severe and even dangerous. ... [N. B. The terrified hackman, picking himself up, found her already on her feet. Oh! Mrs. Howe, he cried, let me help you into the house! Nonsense! was the reply. I have just time to catch my train! ] To Maud 241 Beacon Street, February 24, 1895. I lost a good lecture engagement at Poughkeepsie through a blizzard. Did not stg's exercise, a young man, well known in the community, was heard to inquire urgently where he could find the lecturer. Friends asked, what did he want of her? He replied: Well, I did put my brother in the poorhouse, and now that I have heard Mrs. Howe, I suppose that I must take him out. Another personal reminiscence goes back to her childhood days:-- I had a nursery governess when I was a small child. She came from some country town, and probably regarded her position in my father's
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
can do for these people. And I resolved not to go back from the purpose which prompted this prayer. Arrived at St. John [New Brunswick] and was made very welcome. Reception in the evening by the ladies of the Council. Speeches: Rev. Mr. De Wars, Anglican minister, spoke of our taking A. A.W. to England. I wondered if this was my handwriting on the wall. October 10. Wheaton Seminary Club, Vendome. Reminiscences of Longfellow and Emerson.... As I was leaving one lady said to me, Mrs. Howe, you have shocked me very much, and I think that when you go to the other world, you will be sorry that you did not stay as you were, i.e., Orthodox instead of Unitarian. Miss Emerson apologized to me for this rather uncivil greeting. I feel sure that the lady misunderstood something in my lecture. What, I could not tell. November 1. The Communion service was very delightful. I prayed quite earnestly this morning that the dimness of sight, which has lately troubled me, might disappe
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
rejoinder. The President was appealed to. dear Mrs. Howe, I am sure that you never laid a hand on your children! oh, yes, said dear Mrs. Howe. I cuffed 'em a bit when I thought they needed it! even militancy coulit. Again the appeal was made. can you imagine, Mrs. Howe, under any circumstances-- the twinkle came int the good that men do survives them, I referred to Dr. Howe's first efforts for the Blind and to his teaching ower-decked rooms, he said, this is all very fine, Mrs. Howe; but on your ninetieth Birthday I shall come, and . He bowed to a box, in which we first recognized Mrs. Howe, sitting with the Misses Wheeler. You should haves furious in tone, especially one addressed to Mrs. Howe, Negro Sympathizer, Boston. this grieved her, earance in a meeting and dinner at hotel Vendome, Mrs. Howe presiding, Colonel Higginson (whom she described ay, the president of the association cried: Honneur à Howe! Affect., Mother. August 17.... In the evenin
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
H. Perkins. The occasion was to me one of solemn joy and thankfulness. Senator Hoar presided with beautiful grace, preluding with some lovely reminiscences of Dr. Howe's visit to his office in Worcester, Massachusetts, when he, Hoar, was a young lawyer. Sanborn and Manatt excelled themselves, Humphreys did very well. Hoar req Senator Hoar's words come back to us to-day, and we see his radiant smile as he led her forward. It is only the older ones among us, he said, who have seen Dr. Howe, but there are hundreds here who will want to tell their children that they have seen the author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic. Part of her word was as fabout Wordsworth. I hunted up some verses written about him in my early enthusiasm, probably in 1840 or 1841. This I read and then told of my visit to him with Dr. Howe and the unpleasantness of the experience. Spoke also of the reaction in England against the morbid discontent which is so prominent and powerful in much of Byro