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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 173 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 51 3 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 42 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 21 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Julia Ward Howe or search for Julia Ward Howe in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
and copies issued by the association at whose instance it was delivered, and an edition of ten thousand copies issued by the Republican State committee of New York. Seward promptly wrote from Auburn: Your speech in every part is noble and great. Even you never spoke so well. This and Sumner's later address at Worcester he called masterpieces. Descriptions of Sumner as an orator, stating his peculiarities, were given by Theodore Tilton in the New York Independent, July 19, and by Mrs. Julia Ward Howe in the New York Tribune, November 16. Sumner, as usual, was more sensitive than he need to have been to the criticisms of old friends like Greeley and Bryant, and to the want of response from others; and in a letter to Gerrit Smith, June 11, he mentioned how much he missed Horace Mann, William Jay, and Theodore Parker, all recently deceased, of whose sympathy he was always assured. But the popular approval he received was all he could desire. He wrote, September 2, to R. Schlei