hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 167 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 145 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 129 7 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 36 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 31 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 20 2 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 18 6 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 17 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 13 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 11 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Samuel G. Howe or search for Samuel G. Howe in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
1758, followed by that of Quebec in 1759, and the British occupation of the St. John as far as the Nashwaak; and were already aware of the natural advantages of the territory. The first Essex County migration to Nova Scotia (as New Brunswick was then called) took place in the spring of 1763 in a packet sloop of forty tons burthen, Hatheway's Hist. New Brunswick, p. 7. commanded by Captain Newman. The following spring brought a reinforcement of colonists in the sloop commanded by Captain Howe, which became an annual Ibid., p. 8. trader to the River, and the only means of communication between the Pilgrims and their native land. The arrival was most timely, for an early frost had blighted Ibid., p. 10. the crop of the previous year, and reduced the firstcomers almost to actual want. The settlement now embraced families, more or less connected with each other, from Rowley, Boxford, Byfield, Ipswich, Stickney Genealogy, p. 166. Marblehead, and adjacent towns, among wh
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
ing of our panegyrics, recollecting that indiscriminate praise of the dead is often more injurious than the coarsest obloquy. The struggle for independence then going on in Greece excited wide interest and sympathy in the United States, Sam. G. Howe. and the reports from Dr. Howe and other Americans who had gone to Greece either as spectators or participants in the conflict were eagerly printed. The Free Press copied from the New Hampshire Gazette a series of seventeen articles entitledDr. Howe and other Americans who had gone to Greece either as spectators or participants in the conflict were eagerly printed. The Free Press copied from the New Hampshire Gazette a series of seventeen articles entitled Views of Greece, by a Mr. Estwick Evans, who gave, it must be confessed, a rather dull and prosy account of his experiences in that country, with reflections on some of the Americans who had gone thither to proffer their aid, and who were popularly but erroneously supposed to be rendering valiant service in the cause of the struggling Greeks. These naturally elicited rejoinders in their defence, and sharp attacks on Mr. Evans, by the friends of the absent patriots, and in the ensuing discussio